Paints - Schmincke
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Thread: Paints - Schmincke

  1. #1

    Default Paints - Schmincke

    Hi there, I just started getting intrested into painting minis. I bought a starterkit from rackham but I\'m far from happy with the colors. Doing watercolors for years I always loved products from the brand \'Schmincke\', especially since they have excellent mixing properties. I wonder if anyone has got any experience with their set of arcylic paints.
    Are they simply not suitable since Vallejo colors or alike have some special binders needed for painting on tin? Or are they just uncommon possibly due to their price tag?

  2. #2

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    you got me there....i have honestly never heard of schmincke before...i know quite a few of us use oils to paint as well. but not too sure.....have you tried p3 paints yet. they are pretty good and then of course the theirs reapers masters series which i actually like over vallejo.

    its really up to you.
    cheers

    uber

    p.s. welcome to the forums

  3. #3

    Default

    I\'ve never heard of Schminke, either, I\'m afraid. If you\'ve had good results with their watercolours, the acrylics could well be worth a try. I don\'t think there\'s a significant difference between most \"miniature\" acrylics and \"artist\" acrylics, except possibly in terms of how well they water down, and that can vary a lot from brand to brand.

    Most mini paint ranges nowadays seem to have a \"basic\" paint range, which is fine for pretty much any paintjob, and a \"master\" range, which often has higher levels of pigment and/or water-soluble colour so that they thin down better and are (in theory) better for techniques like layering. The basic ranges will certainly get the job done, tho.

    I\'d recommend the P3 paints as well if you decide to buy a \"mini-specialised\" brand, they behave very nicely as a rule. However, if you want to use metallics, I personally prefer the Games Workshop paints. Other people have different opinions, and most people have different paints from different makers (for example, I have paint from 6 manufacturers).

    Question: is your Rackham starter set one of the new pre-painted plastic sets? If it is, could you keep us posted on how easy/difficult it is to repaint them. I, for one, am curious to see what can be done with them. :)

  4. #4

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    Originally posted by Tsajas
    Are they simply not suitable since Vallejo colors or alike have some special binders needed for painting on tin?
    This isn\'t really an issue since you should really paint onto primer, not directly onto the metal or resin.

    The surface finish of the acrylics could be a problem though - most artists\' acrylics dry to a satin or semi-gloss finish and the majority of miniaturists prefer a consistent matt finish, which is provided by the majority of hobby paints. Although you can always use a matt varnish regardless.

    Originally posted by Tsajas
    Or are they just uncommon possibly due to their price tag?
    They work out cheaper in the long run actually, no matter the high initial cost per tube :)

    I think it\'s likely that they\'re just not associated with minis, while dedicated hobby paints like Andrea, Vallejo, Citadel, P3 etc. are made for and marketed directly to hobbyists. Plus the colours of artists\' paints mean there\'s no ready-made uniform or flesh or leather colours, so you have to learn to mix almost everything (which takes a lot more learning and a lot more work every time you paint).

    Doesn\'t mean nobody uses them - this is the type of paint I\'ve used for most of my figure painting for years - just not common amongst mini painters.


    Originally posted by Amazon warrior
    I\'ve never heard of Schminke, either, I\'m afraid.
    You\'re in Germany and you\'ve never seen Schmincke? ???;):D

    Originally posted by Amazon warrior
    don\'t think there\'s a significant difference between most \"miniature\" acrylics and \"artist\" acrylics, except possibly in terms of how well they water down, and that can vary a lot from brand to brand.
    They are really quite different kinds of paints. Although they can handle very similarly, most hobby \'acrylics\' are actually vinyl paints (modified versions of cell-vinyl paint as used by animators). The different binder is one reason that the hobby paints dry matt but they\'re also potentially higher in pigment load, so have the possibility to be more opaque.

    Einion

  5. #5

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    Originally posted by Einion
    Originally posted by Amazon warrior
    I\'ve never heard of Schminke, either, I\'m afraid.
    You\'re in Germany and you\'ve never seen Schmincke? ???;):D
    In my defense, I\'ve not been here that long! :P

    Originally posted by Einion
    Originally posted by Amazon warrior
    don\'t think there\'s a significant difference between most \"miniature\" acrylics and \"artist\" acrylics, except possibly in terms of how well they water down, and that can vary a lot from brand to brand.
    They are really quite different kinds of paints. Although they can handle very similarly, most hobby \'acrylics\' are actually vinyl paints (modified versions of cell-vinyl paint as used by animators). The different binder is one reason that the hobby paints dry matt but they\'re also potentially higher in pigment load, so have the possibility to be more opaque.
    I stand corrected, as the man said to his osteopath...

  6. #6

    Default

    Thank you for all the answers. I didn\'t expect such a quick reply :)

    I\'d have one more question concerning mixing of colors. Do the \'rules\' of watercolor mixing apply more or less for acrylics too?
    Schmincke colors are usually \'pure\' colors (in the sense of consiting of a single pigment type). Would a cadmium yellow and cobalt blue result in vivid greens or would they have a slighty dull touch?
    In watercolors when trying to darken a color you\'d use \'panye grey\' usually and avoid pure black. Does the same apply for acrylics as well?

  7. #7

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    Originally posted by Amazon warrior
    In my defense, I\'ve not been here that long! :P
    Roger roger.

    Originally posted by Amazon warrior
    I stand corrected, as the man said to his osteopath...
    lol


    Originally posted by Tsajas
    Do the \'rules\' of watercolor mixing apply more or less for acrylics too?
    Very similar, yes.

    Originally posted by Tsajas
    In watercolors when trying to darken a color you\'d use \'panye grey\' usually and avoid pure black. Does the same apply for acrylics as well?
    This is done differently by different people, depending on their preferences, taste, what they were taught, their biases or whatever. Some people would darken with neither black nor Payne\'s Grey but by using paired mixing complements (e.g. Phthalo Blue GS and Cadmium Scarlet or Venetian Red).

    Incidentally not a few people who are against the use of black, but do use Payne\'s Grey, are actually unaware that it\'s mixed using a black pigment usually (tee hee).

    Einion

  8. #8

    Default

    no real input here..i just enjoy reading any post that Einion responds too, his responses are like a college art class, and me being an art major, well, i dig it haha. good stuff!

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