the handy little hints thread
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Thread: the handy little hints thread

  1. #1

    Default the handy little hints thread

    i often read threads and pick up little tips that people mention on the side and so thought having a thread may help more people pick up things that arent worth an article on there own but may help others especially newbies.
    so just pop a little hint or tip in:

    my little tip is i keep one of those syringes you use for kids medicine full of water, the water keeps clean and is easy to dispense for mixing

  2. #2

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    Keep my water right in front of me........don\'t lick the brush as much.

  3. #3
    sg2009
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    keep your paints thin

  4. #4

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    My tip is: dont buy the new GW washes, for the same price you could get 5 tubes of Vallejo\'s matt medium plus a couple of bottles of mineral water.

  5. #5

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    When using a magnifying device to paint, always try painting something large and easy first, like a cloak to get used to the distortion caused by the lense.

    Use a colour wheel, even if you think you may know all the compliments, you probably haven\'t memorized all the triads, the quaterets, etc. and theres that great \"add X colour to this to get...\" that is great for highlighting and shading.

    Along with that last note, don\'t add black or dark brown for shading, add the complimentary colour to your base colour.

  6. #6

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    Put down a sheet of waxed paper before playing with Greenstuff or Sculpey.

    Use your own nose grease to keep GS from sticking to your sculpting tools lol

    If you\'re new to sculpting, buy a \"burnisher\" and a dental pick, they\'re both pretty damn handy.

    Do not not NOT let the blue stuff sit on a laminated/veneered/foil finish surface, it\'ll stick, and rip a divot right the **** out of it, and you\'ll be sorry!

    /not a very good sculptor, actually

  7. #7

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    Stir your paints, don\'t just shake them. That\'s right, open up the bottle and stir \'em up. Makes sure your paints are living up to their full potential.

  8. #8

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    Use your own nose grease to keep GS from sticking to your sculpting tools lol
    Dude. Yuck.


    ...great idea. lol

  9. #9

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    ^^ not my idea, but it\'s one that comes up often in sculpting threads. Personally, I use water, but it\'s not at all the best way to do it, just the easiest to clean up.

  10. #10

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    If you have a small pock mark on a smooth surface like a cloak that\'s just a bit too large to file down, you can fill it with CA glue. Put a tiny dab on, wait 5-10 minutes then file it smooth with the surface.

    Likewise, if you\'ve got an area that\'s just kind of generally rough or a not perfect join between GS and metal surface, you can make it look smoother with several coats of brush-on primer.

    You can reuse the paper towels you use to dry off your brushes. I have five or six paper \'dinner\' napkins in rotation at any given time, and they last a good while.

  11. #11
    Superfreak!!! lizcam's Avatar
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    If you have a sculpt that is rough use a brush on primer and then a few coats of magic wash over the large areas. Fills in all the little holes and pits. Just be careful as it will play havoc with fine detail sometimes.

  12. #12

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    The pigment in all paints settles out, and even with a firm shake can be hard to re-suspend into the medium. If you use GW paints, drop a small 3/32\" ball bearing (or, believe-it-or-not small nut) into the pot. Next when you shake it the bearing / nut will do all the work and keep the medium saturated with pigment.

  13. #13

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    Keep your glass of Coke far away from your cup of paint water! I know this from experience!

    Brown Ink works great for painting sand. Since it\'s so thin, the sand \"absorbs\" it and makes basing a breeze. Since you can\'t get GW inks anymore, I bought the P3 Brown Ink. It\'s just as good as the old GW ink(even though it\'s a bit on the red side).

    -Matt

  14. #14
    Superfreak!!! Dragonsreach's Avatar
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    Keep a notebook handy when your are painting, helps with being able to remember \"How did I do XXXXX?\" moments.

  15. #15

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    Originally posted by Wren


    Likewise, if you\'ve got an area that\'s just kind of generally rough or a not perfect join between GS and metal surface, you can make it look smoother with several coats of brush-on primer.
    als, you can water down millput into a wash to use over the area

    when sculpting, don\'t mix too much putty at once, you can always mix more but can\'t mix less!

    although if you have any left over, you can roll into long cylinders (like a stretched out paper clip). once dry, it can but cut up into spent shell cases and rivets

    also learn the texture of putties at different stages of their curing, they change quite a bit and can be used to your advantage

  16. #16

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    Some putties are water soluble. You can use those to make a \"putty wash\" that will help you fill in little microscopic holes and produce a really smooth surface (just paint it onto the surface and sand when it is dry, don\'t try to find the holes, that\'s a futile exercise).

    Sometimes youl will get great results by first putting some water/wash mixture on the mini and directly adding the paint. This is a quite fiddly technique but it looks nice for things like folds in cloaks. It can also be used for dirt and will usually blend all by itself if you put two patches right next to each other. It is very hard to control though.

    Use the appropriate brush. No sense in using a 3/0 to basecoat, larger brushes will give you a cleaner coat o larger areas. That\'s especially true for drybrushing.

    Your brushstroke should always end where you want the majority of the paint to be (for example, when highlighting end your stroke on the highest point). This is a very simple and obvious thing to do that took me years to find out.

  17. #17

    Default Superglue tips

    Baking soda sets superglue instantly or close to it. You can use this to fill large areas that you want to sand to shape in a hurry. This is also good for roughening up a smooth armature (like paperclip wire) to help putty adhere.

    It is the water in air and on surfaces that starts the setting of superglue. This is also what makes it go off so often in the tube before you\'ve had a chance to use most of it! The best way I know of to slow this down is to seal the cap joint with a long, wound strip of Parafilm-M.

    Superglue gets harder over time. When working on softer materials like resin it\'s best to sand it in the same session it\'s applied, not wait until the next day.

    You can glue a joint with a larger surface area using superglue and epoxy - dots of superlue act like \'spot welds\' to hold the parts together while the epoxy sets, eventually providing most of the strength in the joint.

    If you need to break apart a superglued joint it gets more brittle when cold, so pop the thing in the freezer for a couple of hours. Often it\'s best to twist things apart (if the parts allow) than to pull directly apart as superglue has poor shear strength but is much stronger in tension.

    Superglue accelerators are made to help set joints instantly but this usually results in a weaker joint from what I\'ve read.

    In a pinch superglue can be used to seal cuts. It\'s not totally sterile - they make medical-grade superglue for this - but if you\'re in a hurry it holds the edges together quite well and stops bleeding. Covered with a normal plaster I\'ve had wounds heal in record time using it for this, with minimal scarring.

    Acetone is a decent superglue remover, although it usually doesn\'t dissolve it but will soften it, allowing it to be peeled off more easily. Acetone is often, but not always, the main ingredient in nail-polish removers. If you\'re using a lot of it ensure good ventilation.

    Superglue is a good wood finish, providing a tough, waterproof coating. You can use this to make your own sculpting tools with a glassy-smooth surface, from shaped cocktail sticks for example, for very little money. It sets so fast too that if you break one you can often make a replacement and be using it before the putty you were using has set.

    Einion

  18. #18

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    Originally posted by Tonka
    If you use GW paints, drop a small 3/32\" ball bearing (or, believe-it-or-not small nut) into the pot.
    Ooh, not such a good idea! As was attested to in a recent thread, they can rust!

  19. #19
    Superfreak!!! lizcam's Avatar
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    Originally posted by mattsterbenz
    Keep your glass of Coke far away from your cup of paint water! I know this from experience!

    -Matt
    On this note never put you drink in a cup that\'s the same shape as you paint water. They don\'t taste the same at all!

  20. #20

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    Use an old toothbrush and warm soapy water to scrub the release agent off your models before you prime them, and remove ALL flash and mould lines before you start painting, they magically become the most prominent features otherwise.

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