wet palette despair
Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: wet palette despair

  1. #1

    Default wet palette despair

    For years I mixed my paints on a ceramic tile to a little thicker than milk and always get on very well. Recently, I have been tyring to up my game in certain ways, and have been trying a wet palette, for the various suggested advantages it offers. I despair. The paint seems too thin, it dries with a milky effect, it feels like it will take 100 coats to get a solid colour with it, I find it impossible to do detail work with it as when I brush the \"paint\" on, it just sits in a thin translucent film and dries in seconds, leaving hardly a trace.

    Are wet palettes just for blending? If so, how many coats does it take?

    I have photo\'d my setup, to see if people spot anything seriously wrong. When I drab my paint onto the sponge, it spreads out rapidly. I cant take any back with the brush then without sucking up a load of water with it!

    I really miss my ceramic tile; :(


  2. #2
    Superfreak!!! Dragonsreach's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Bolton, Lancs, UK (A Geordie in Exile)
    Posts
    17,326
    Rep Power
    38

    Default

    Is this home made?
    Because I can\'t see the baking parchment that is supposed to sit on top of the sponge and on which the paint is placed.

  3. #3

    Default

    It\'s not homemade, but I thought the parchment sheets I got were too thin - I didnt know they had to go on top.

    Sorry for being such a muppet, I\'ll try it now with a sheet of the paper on top of the sponge.

    Should there be just enough water in the tray to soak the sponge, or a little more, so it swills around the base of the sponge aswell?

  4. #4

    Default

    I think I see the problem straight away :D

    You need the bit of paper that goes on top of the sponge.

    I see you have a store bought wet pallet this should have come with two types of paper (you can buy them in the craft shop seperate to the pallet as refills) one is absorbant and acts like the sponge (forget about it the sponge is better) the other is like baking parchment and is the piece you want as that will allow you to keep the paint in the pallet without it preading out and getting too much liquid.

    I use a simular set up to yourself but I bought a pack of the sponge type cloths from ASDA and lined the pallet with them (you\'ll need to cut them to fit all areas) I then fill the pallet to ensure the sponge is wet and then tip the pallet up on its side to drain out excess water once done add a piece of the top layer paper and away you go, you should be able to keep the paint usable for about 2 to 3 weeks.

  5. #5

    Default

    Yep, definitely missing one of the most important parts :)

    Originally posted by scottjames
    It\'s not homemade, but I thought the parchment sheets I got were too thin...
    If you do find them too thin once you\'ve used them you can try baking parchment, baking paper or tracing vellum as alternatives.
    Originally posted by scottjames
    Should there be just enough water in the tray to soak the sponge, or a little more, so it swills around the base of the sponge aswell?
    It depends a bit. Try it just dampened, see if it works okay. Add more water if necessary.

    Einion

  6. #6

    Default

    rofl! use the parchment fella, its there for a reason

  7. #7

    Default Half a wet palette

    Oh well - you live and you learn. I can imagine that paint straight off the sponge would be terrible to work with. No wonder you pined for the trusty ceramic tile! Chuck some parchment paper on top once you\'ve loaded the sponge with good cold drinking/filtered water. Put the paint on top of the parchment paper and the water will slowly seep through the porous parchment paper keeping your paint nice and fresh.:)

  8. #8

    Default

    hehe, thanks for the tip. ! I am now using my wet palette and thinking I could get used to it after all (though I still miss my tile, I guess just because I used it for so many years .. onwards and upwards though, seems like all you pros are using wet palettes! :))

  9. #9

    Default

    Originally posted by scottjames
    I am now using my wet palette and thinking I could get used to it after all (though I still miss my tile, I guess just because I used it for so many years .. onwards and upwards though, seems like all you pros are using wet palettes! :))
    I used a Perspex palette for around 20 years before moving to a wet palette after finally making one up and giving it a go.

    Never too late to try something new... and regret not trying it sooner!!

    Einion

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Privacy Policy  |   Terms and Conditions  |   Contact Us  |   The Legion


Copyright © 2001-2018 CMON Inc.

-->