Water-mixable oils??
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Thread: Water-mixable oils??

  1. #1

    Default Water-mixable oils??

    Hello everyone,

    I recently discovered there was such a thing as water-mixable oils, and I immediately thought \"Washes!!\"

    So my question is, does anyone use water-mixables, and how are they for making washes? Also, is it still necessary to gloss-coat your model before the wash goes on when using WMOs?

  2. #2

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    Windsor Newton is one of the big producers of the water soluble oils. I\'ve never used the water soluble oils but have used the fast drying (relatively) oils which are called alkyds. I\'ve found that oil paints tend to lay on MUCH more smoothly. You can get an airbrush like smooth transition due to the physical properties of the paint and the fact that with the alkyds you have a working time of about 15 minutes. They actually fully dry in a few hours if it\'s warm.


    http://www.cheapjoes.com/art-supplies/4729_winsor-newton-artisan-water-soluble-oils.asp

  3. #3

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    I am sure you can use them for washes;I see certain convenience in that (one set of brush instead of two, one diluent instead of two and son on), what I am not sure about it whether this water soluble oil would have the same properties. The beauty of \"regular\" oils are mostly due to the diluent (turpentine or other organic stuff) that has almost no surface tension and therefore levels very well. I am not sure how water-soluble oils, that relies on properties of water will be different from acrylic.
    It is interesting idea though. If you try it let us know how it worked


  4. #4
    Superfreak!!! Dragonsreach's Avatar
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    Default

    Originally posted by Gearhead
    Hello everyone,

    I recently discovered there was such a thing as water-mixable oils, and I immediately thought \"Washes!!\"

    So my question is, does anyone use water-mixables, and how are they for making washes? Also, is it still necessary to gloss-coat your model before the wash goes on when using WMOs?
    Yes I have, quite effectively. Sam, AlextheArtist and BorisTfrog have seen them in action.
    Basically Water SOLUBLE oils are exactly that. Oil paints that you can dilute with either Water or Oduorless thinners. The thinners dry the paints quicker, but as washes I\'ve found that the oils need a lot of Coaxing.
    If you make a water wash it can be dried via a Hairdryer.

  5. #5

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    Originally posted by Shawn R. L.
    Windsor Newton is one of the big producers of the water soluble oils. I\'ve never used the water soluble oils but have used the fast drying (relatively) oils which are called alkyds. I\'ve found that oil paints tend to lay on MUCH more smoothly. You can get an airbrush like smooth transition due to the physical properties of the paint and the fact that with the alkyds you have a working time of about 15 minutes. They actually fully dry in a few hours if it\'s warm.

    I\'ve used the Alkyds too, thought they were great, used them on my Shaggoth (torso)

  6. #6
    Coffin Dodger / Keymaster airhead's Avatar
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    I played with them on a Sophie (72 mm) and found that, like oils, they take forever to \'dry\'.

    Makes blending very smooth and you can take your time as you can go back tomorrow and rework an area. But it is easy to overdo - then everything looks the same color and you\'ve lost your contrast.

    New learning process, but fun to play with.

    I also did it on a large green lizard, you could wipe the paint of the high spots for weeks - and I thought I put it on fairly thin.....

    A coat of DulCoat is almost a must to \'set\' this stuff.

  7. #7
    Superfreak!!! Dragonsreach's Avatar
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    Originally posted by airhead
    A coat of DulCoat is almost a must to \'set\' this stuff.
    Kevin;
    Unless it\'s completely dry it can also be a good way to get that \"Crackle\" effect.

  8. #8

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    i find i often over blend ad airhead mentioned, turning everything into a crappy midtone! time to practice

  9. #9

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    yep, that over-blending is an issue, but they give you such a smooth blend with a little practice. Also, very often oil paints can hold a lot of good quality pigment, compared with the hobby paints we are used to using, so you can get some wonderfully vibrant colours from them :) watch out though, the best ones are superbly expensive (like £25/$40-50 per small tube), however, providing you;re only working on 30/52/120mm minis, they\'ll last you a lifetime.

    go for it! check out my ninja goblin wip thread for someone using water soluble oils.

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