Painting buildings
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Thread: Painting buildings

  1. #1

    Default Painting buildings

    Has anyone got any links to a how to paint buildings please, i have a cheap airbrush but being new to painting am not sure what to do, any help much appreciated.

    I'm hoping to paint forgeworld 40k buildings.

  2. #2

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    Something that seldom goes wrong is to use your airbrush for the base colour, then wash it with a darker version of the same colour. When the wash is dry, just go with a heavy drybrush all over the building with a light-brown/grey colour.
    You'll get very far using grey or sand colours on the forge world buildings.

    So, a simple recipe for a gray building (with gw foundation paints and washes):
    1: Prime the model in whatever colour you fancy.
    2: Basecoat with fenris grey.
    3: wash with badab black.
    4: Heavy drybrush with astronomican grey.
    5: Paint out details

    It certainly won't win you any demons but it will look great on a battle field.

    Oh, and welcome to the forums!
    Quote Originally Posted by TrystanGST View Post
    The secret? Practice, and a desire to get better. A little talent goes a long way, but as long as you're open to advice, you can do amazing things.

  3. #3

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    I've seen a very good DVD about painting buildings, using airbrush, regular brush, oil washes and pigments. I don't remember what it was called or who made it, but I think it is this one:
    http://www.frontiermodels.co.uk/Real...s-p-17371.html
    Combibo vestri peniculus quod fio a melior pictor.
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  4. #4

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    Thanks Chrome, that sounds like a plan regarding the colours, and thanks Ritual, I was hoping for a free link, but you saying about pigments has given me an idea, as I'm not a fan of drybrushing.

    It does seem to be a neglected subject overall.

  5. #5

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    In the DVD the artist uses pigment washes quite heavily. He makes washes by mixing pigment and white spirit. After applying the wash to the surface of the building he uses a hairdryer to speed up the evaporisation of the white spirit. When it's dry he uses a dry, flat brush to blend and move the pigments around. It is easy and effective!
    Combibo vestri peniculus quod fio a melior pictor.
    My gallery - go have a look!

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Baylien View Post
    It does seem to be a neglected subject overall.
    Lots and lots of stuff on painting buildings, just not in the mini-oriented places (although there are a couple I think). One good place to look for helpful tips is on sites dedicated to railway modelling, where painting buildings and other structures is one of the main preoccupations.

    If you want to go full-on in the realism stakes, check out the book recommended in this thread.

    Einion

  7. #7

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    Thanks again Ritual, great idea, I read about that in the book Einon has mentioned above, I do have a copy although its all about painting tanks, hence my first painted tank in my gallery lol. hint hint! lol.


    Oh the price of that book was £26 not £71 and it is recommended, i just wish they had done something on buildings. I guess that will be their next book vol 2.

    thanks Einon i'll look up railway modelling, great idea.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Baylien View Post
    Oh the price of that book was £26 not £71 and it is recommended, i just wish they had done something on buildings. I guess that will be their next book vol 2.
    The Welch book has quite a bit on painting buildings in it, although a lot of the basic techniques can be applied to varied subject matter - rusted rail car = oil drum, if you get what I mean.

    Einion

  9. #9

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    Thanks Einion, i see the welch book now, does look good, I do love to look at railway modelling and can see how these books could help.

    From your posted link i saw the Forgeworld masterclass book, and thought they ment that was £71 lol.

  10. #10

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    Sorry I should have been clearer and said the book I recommended in that thread

    Einion

  11. #11

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    I've been undercoating in mid grey, then applying a quick spray can highlight from an angle with a lighter grey and sometimes white. Wash down with acrylic or oils then crack out the airbrush and start to dirty/shade things up with browns and blacks. Easy!




  12. #12

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    Wow, love those, thanks for the photo's, so do you suggest the same for buildings?

    That dirty look, worn and battered stonework is what i'm looking for, my airbrush is a bit naff though so i will have the experiment.

  13. #13

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    the same technique could be used, just use difference colours. maybe add some brown/ochres to the mis to break up the grey
    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v433/freak-in-a-cage/freakinacage-1.jpg

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Baylien View Post
    Wow, love those, thanks for the photo's, so do you suggest the same for buildings?

    That dirty look, worn and battered stonework is what i'm looking for, my airbrush is a bit naff though so i will have the experiment.
    Doesn't matter about an Airbrush or not.
    Things to remember: Buildings are vertical and subject to water and gravity so the weathering will be straight up and down and pooled on flat surfaces.
    You can make life easier for yourself by utilising the right brush in the right means.ie a flat brush is best IMO.
    Baadab Black does make for good shadow/depth, but why not think about painting Baddab on the building while holding upside down. That way the wash will gather more effectively causing the shadows to fall in the 'right' places.
    I'd suggest taking the opportunity to go look at buildings, the older the better, and observe the cornicing and window ledges for the dirt and weathering.

    Oh and the biggest thing to remember is that not all dirt is black. Browns greens and purples are tones you will see in rust, Algae and general grunge around a town.
    I believe in Karma, what you give, is what you get returned. Affirmation; Savage Garden
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  15. #15

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    Try not to be too neat. Perfect smooth surfaces rarely happen on buildings other than brand new polished stainless steel and such. Dry brushing works well and without being too obvious about it, keep much of the brush work, overall, up and down. Helps give the stains and such 'gravity'.

  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Baylien View Post
    Wow, love those, thanks for the photo's, so do you suggest the same for buildings?
    If you love those you're going to be blown away by the results in the Welch book!

    Quote Originally Posted by Baylien View Post
    ...my airbrush is a bit naff though so i will have the experiment.
    Naff airbrush is fine - long as you get decent atomisation that's enough. I use double-action airbrushes just like I would a simpler single-action model for painting models; with the right technique and follow-up brushwork you can get excellent results.


    Quote Originally Posted by Dragonsreach View Post
    I'd suggest taking the opportunity to go look at buildings, the older the better, and observe the cornicing and window ledges for the dirt and weathering.
    Yes! References make all the difference; with the advent of digital photography there's no excuse not to take reams of photos of rusted pipes, rain-streaked concrete, worn brickwork, broken slates, moss, cracked pavement, broken tarmac... or is that just me?

    Seriously though, working from the imagination tends to create stilted results (grey concrete being a classic example, when in fact concrete is rarely actually grey). So if one is after something better, then working from references is key.

    Einion

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    Quote Originally Posted by Einion View Post
    .there's no excuse not to take reams of photos of rusted pipes, rain-streaked concrete, worn brickwork, broken slates, moss, cracked pavement, broken tarmac... or is that just me?
    It's just you.

    Seriously though, working from the imagination tends to create stilted results (grey concrete being a classic example, when in fact concrete is rarely actually grey). So if one is after something better, then working from references is key.
    Yeah got to second that statement, Concrete varies from flat (Vallejo MC Neutral Grey/London Grey) grey through to a warm beige.

    One thing to consider.....Bl**dy pidgeons. They leave a ton of cr*p on old window ledges if undisturbed.
    Blister packs make reasonable broken glass for the windows as well.
    I believe in Karma, what you give, is what you get returned. Affirmation; Savage Garden
    Oh look my IQ results came in:-
    , and proud of it.

  18. #18

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    Wow, excellent replies, Einon, I can see me getting into this, i have been looking at buildings, stonework especially, there are some great colours in plain stonework, and how the shadows fall, i know my effort will be average at best but will try to do a good job on these, i'll post wip's as i go along.
    I'm at the priming stage today and will give them the first blast tomorrow.

    Love the vertical weathering idea, that will help loads!!!!

  19. #19

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    I've had a go at a test piece, and would appreciate comments, before i do the rest of the buildings. I like the colour, but might put some weathering powders onto it as well. The photo is slightly over exposed, i hope i can do some better ones tomorrow in daylight, or reluctantly get my light tent out, which i cant get the hang of, lol.



    Last edited by Baylien; 11-29-2009 at 06:34 PM.

  20. #20

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    The building looks very nice, from what I can tell from the pictures. I think, however, that the surrounding rubble is a bit too harshly contrasted, and adding pigment powders to it would help reducing the harshness a bit and making it look more life-like.
    Combibo vestri peniculus quod fio a melior pictor.
    My gallery - go have a look!

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