cheap good airbrush?
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  1. #1

    Default cheap good airbrush?

    I would like to get a airbrush/airbrush kit but cant spend alot of money is there any good airbrushes that are cheap that can be used for detailed work?

  2. #2

  3. #3

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    The Badger 200 was my first real airbrush, solid well built.
    This is called a single action airbrush, which mean the trigger does only one thing. You push down and it releases the air. Paint flow is controlled by the thumb screw and the back, you test it and it will stay that way
    A double action, the trigger controls both the air ( push down ) and will slide the needle back and forth to control the paint. You can control the amount of paint on the fly.
    There are other brushes out there like Iwata, I call them the Cadilac of Airbrushes. What I find here in North America part can be expensive and sometimes hard to find.A friend broke one of the glass bottle and it cost him $35 to place. I usually recommend Badger for beginners because parts are not as expensive and are easy to find at any art or hobby shop.
    You can call local shops and ask them and see the availablity and cost of parts before you purchase. Each artist will have his preference
    Hope this helps alittle.

  4. #4

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    Cheap and good can be mutually exclusive and in airbrush terms price is often a good indicator of quality (and qualities).

    If you are okay with ordering online from the US there are a number of good suppliers given in previous threads... I mention the previous threads because there are at least a handful from the last year alone, all of which cover the basics - including the usual thing that's not considered, the compressor. This will tend to set you back more than the actual brush unfortunately, but there's no real alternative for most people; and canned air is not a viable option.

    So the simple answer to your question is no. Detail painting especially tends to be something that only high-end ABs are really good at but there's more to it than that, which is covered in some detail in a few of the old threads.

    In terms of the brush alone there are some decent choices in the sub-£100 category, with a few new additions only in the past year or so which helps, but you'll probably have to spend double (at least) to get a compressor too if you don't already have one.

    Einion

  5. #5

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    From bitter experience I'd say your best bet is to buy (decent) quality gear from the outset.

    I wouldn't touch that single action badger with a barge pole personally - you can get an Iwata HP-C for similar money.

  6. #6

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    honestly if your not looking to get into too much detail the gw one is good for base coats and minor detail work. but if your looking ofr something good. i would go with the iwata.
    Brushlicking is the miniature painting equivalent of a rock'n'roll life-style!

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  7. #7
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    What are you wanting to do with it?

    That will make all the difference in what is the 'least' airbrush you can get for the purpose.

    If you are just talking about priming minis? or large areas of terrain?

    Shading and highlighting the flesh on large anime models?

    Trying to do details and cammo on armor?

    I can recommend different guns for each of those.
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  8. #8

    Default

    thanks for you comments

    looks like il have to wait untill i save up some more cash as i would rather get one for detailwork and not have to buy another in the future.

  9. #9

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    Very good AB and not expensive at all.If you clean it properly you will have it for years.
    http://www.migproductionsforums.com/...cgr1ti26okdia0
    I have a similar AB and it does the job.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by BuzZin View Post
    looks like il have to wait untill i save up some more cash as i would rather get one for detailwork and not have to buy another in the future.
    What exactly are you looking to be able to spray?

    Einion

  11. #11

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    I actually got that exact airbrush set as my first brush - it did it's job without a doubt, but I'd not consider it for anything along the lines of 'detail'. It's (still) great for getting a good flat layer of colour onto a mini/tank/bulding. I'll be honest and say that within a month or so I ended up getting a compressor and within 6 months a HP-C Plus. The one thing that I will say is that I use significantly less paint with my HP-C than my Badger.

  12. #12

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    FYI, this is a repost of a post I made over on the B&C...

    <><><><><><><><><><><>

    This is my opinion. Take it for what it is - an opinion.

    I've used one or three different models from just about every major vendor (Paasche, Iwata, Badger, Aztek) with a lot of different configurations (gravity vs. syphon feed, single action vs. double-action). They each have advantages and disadvantages.

    Case in point: If you want it to last a lifetime, without buying lots of expensive replacement parts... Never, but NEVER spray anything of a heavy solvent base through an Aztek as the vast majority of the parts are PLASTIC and are NOT solvent resistant!!! The first time I spilled an acetone based AIRBRUSH cleaner (that was recommended to me to be used in it) on the old one I had, I just about died. Which is ironic, considering it's made by Testor's.

    Also, expect to loose parts on an Aztek airbrush. The fiddly bits often have a poor fit after extensive use/swapping - the main selling point on the higher-priced models (hot-swapping tips/nibs). Did I mention that the replacement parts are expensive?

    Badger makes good single-action low to mid-range brushes. Double-action models tend to have slightly loose actions, in my opinion (not a bad thing, just an observation - some people hate it, though). Don't expect fine atomization out of most of the low to mid priced models they make. Paasche and Iwata are the mid to high-end makers, and they charge accordingly.

    The vast majority of airbrush work on miniatures is going to be base coating. Fine detail? Why... That's what the Series 7 Sable is for. Most of the time you don't need fine atomization for that, but it helps for smooth application. My two airbrushes are gravity feed, both with roughly 8cc cups. I've one to base coat a drop pod, only refueling once during the procedure (it's not an issue if you pre-mix your paint in a squeeze bottle).

    That said, knowing how you are likely going to use it - the first thing you need to consider is price. Most good quality airbrushes from the makers listed above are expensive. Expect to pay AT LEAST $100 for a quality brush, with good atomization from the makers above. That does not even include a compressor. Don't mess around with the disposable air cans that last 15 minutes. They are a waste of time and a huge waste of money. Bite the bullet and buy a compressor, too.

    A Badger Renegade R1V double-action from a popular airbrush supplier with the exact, same compressor I recently purchased costs $249.98 US (not including shipping). Don't bother - over priced.

    WARNING - product endorsement follows! I am in no way compensated for this, I am simply a happy customer...

    I recently purchased from a vendor on ebay two brand new airbrushes, one nearly equal to the Badger listed above, with the same compressor, plus two hoses, T-valve, and two quick disconnects for $165 and FREE confirmed, tracked shipping. That's $80 less than the combo above, plus a SECOND airbrush that is BETTER than the Badger.

    The brand is "Air Pro Tools." These are quality brushes at obscenely low prices! They are as good as, if not better than, any Badger double-action brush I have ever used. They are about equal to some of the Paasche and Iwata models I have borrowed over the years - at a fraction of the price.

    The specific models are:
    * PS800 with .3mm tip and about an 8cc gravity feed cup with a friction-fit lid (plus a .2mm and .5mm tip)
    * PS900 with Micro Air Control valve, .2 mm tip and about an 8cc gravity feed cup with a friction-fit lid

    (FYI - the PS 800 looks *EXACTLY* like one of the MIG airbrush linked to above.)

    While not as bad, the action on these models are both slightly "loose" in a similar manner to Badger brushes. The 800 is roughly equal to the Badger RV1 Renegade. The 900 is about equal in performance to an Iwata Custom Micron CM-C Plus, with the same base features (that's a $450 brush). It performed equally as well as my friend's, who does motorcycle detail airbrush work. It even looks almost exactly like it (I almost took his home by mistake after using his forced air spray booth).

    Yes, they are knock-offs. But they are GOOD knock-offs that really work!

    <><><><><><><><><><><><>

    Digging through my links, I've found that the ebay vendor currently does not have anything for sale. Going direct to the supplier's source (link below), the same combo is about $210 US. They have other combos for less money, but I would stick with a compressor with a tank for less wear on the compressor.

    BuyAirbrushes.com
    Last edited by CarbonCopy; 11-22-2009 at 09:03 PM.

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by CarbonCopy View Post
    Case in point: If you want it to last a lifetime, without buying lots of expensive replacement parts... Never, but NEVER spray anything of a heavy solvent base through an Aztek as the vast majority of the parts are PLASTIC and are NOT solvent resistant!!! The first time I spilled an acetone based AIRBRUSH cleaner (that was recommended to me to be used in it) on the old one I had, I just about died. Which is ironic, considering it's made by Testor's.
    I've cleaned my Aztek (see age lower down) regularly with solvents, including acetone and various alcohols for cleaning the nozzle and for spray-through. And I've sprayed Alclad 2 though it; which for those unfamiliar with it is most lacquer thinner.

    Quote Originally Posted by CarbonCopy View Post
    Also, expect to loose parts on an Aztek airbrush. The fiddly bits often have a poor fit after extensive use/swapping - the main selling point on the higher-priced models (hot-swapping tips/nibs).
    Individual mileage varies

    Parts can get looser, that's true, but mine is older than most peoples' (nearing 20 now) and fit of plugs, colour cups and nozzles is tight.

    Quote Originally Posted by CarbonCopy View Post
    Did I mention that the replacement parts are expensive?
    A new colour cup is two or three bucks.

    A new nozzle is about nine.

    Quote Originally Posted by CarbonCopy View Post
    The vast majority of airbrush work on miniatures is going to be base coating.
    Doesn't have to be though. In fact it's a bit of a waste of one if that's all that it's used for.

    Quote Originally Posted by CarbonCopy View Post
    Expect to pay AT LEAST $100 for a quality brush, with good atomization from the makers above.
    The 4709 set - with six nozzles and multiple paint cups - can be found for just under $100. The 4308 - with three and three - is about $77.

    Einion

  14. #14
    Newbie, please be gentle stinlin's Avatar
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    Can I ask what use an airbrush has for miniature painting? It seems like you'd want to be using a small paint brush vs a spraying nozzle type applicator. Sorry the "newbie" question, but I've seen a lot of articles on airbrushes and such, but haven't been able to figure out their use.

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by stinlin View Post
    Can I ask what use an airbrush has for miniature painting? It seems like you'd want to be using a small paint brush vs a spraying nozzle type applicator. Sorry the "newbie" question, but I've seen a lot of articles on airbrushes and such, but haven't been able to figure out their use.
    Well I'm currently thinking about buying this one

    http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.d...=STRK:MEWAX:IT

    I'm planning on using it for undercoating and vehicles or largish models. I believe it's good for shading on smaller models as well.

  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by stinlin View Post
    Can I ask what use an airbrush has for miniature painting? It seems like you'd want to be using a small paint brush vs a spraying nozzle type applicator. Sorry the "newbie" question, but I've seen a lot of articles on airbrushes and such, but haven't been able to figure out their use.
    See this other thread from lower down the first page for a little on how you might use one beyond just basecoats, priming or applying a varnish.

    Einion

  17. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Einion View Post
    I've cleaned my Aztek (see age lower down) regularly with solvents, including acetone and various alcohols for cleaning the nozzle and for spray-through. And I've sprayed Alclad 2 though it; which for those unfamiliar with it is most lacquer thinner.

    Individual mileage varies

    Parts can get looser, that's true, but mine is older than most peoples' (nearing 20 now) and fit of plugs, colour cups and nozzles is tight.

    A new colour cup is two or three bucks.

    A new nozzle is about nine.
    Thanks for the input, Einion. I have a love/hate relationship with Aztek airbrushes. I loved mine when I first purchased it over 15 years, but quickly ran into problems with it. I ended up selling it to someone as a parts unit after only a couple years, then found out the batch it was from had been recalled (my guess is that it was made from the wrong plastic).

    They can be good units if properly maintained and not abused -- by those not suffering from Fat Fingers (I drop fiddly bits a LOT). I know a couple people who swear by them, including that same motorcycle detailer I mentioned.

    And those are really good price points, especially for the replacement nozzles.

    Oh, and I'm a big fan of your work!
    Last edited by CarbonCopy; 11-24-2009 at 03:35 AM.

  18. #18

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    The prices are from Bearair.com, usually my first port of call to compare airbrush prices online.

    Einion

  19. #19

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    @ Einion:

    I´m currently looking at an A470 - would it be a good idea to buy the metal version (7778) instead of the plastic one?
    Last edited by slah; 11-24-2009 at 04:40 PM.

  20. #20

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    The metal body is more for feel than anything else* - they introduced it for people who wanted more heft in an Aztek, so the weight is more like ABs of traditional design.

    Personally I like that the plastic/resin-bodied ones are so light, especially when I'm spraying for a long while, but other people have issues with the low weight.

    *Obviously aesthetics come into it too, no denying they look nice.

    Einion

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