Shadowing violet or purple
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Thread: Shadowing violet or purple

  1. #1

    Default Shadowing violet or purple

    I'm about to working on my second miniature, and I would like to really push my use of "proper" color harmonies, and I use the the word proper very loosely. I will be incorporating quite a bit of violet or purple as my main palette, but I'm kind of unsure on a few things. The biggest question that I have, is it possible to shade or darken a violet or purple without using too much black. The only way I can think of is to add maybe a dark red brown.

  2. #2

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    Use a dark blue. If the blue alone is still too light then you can add a bit of black to it. GW's wash Asurmen Blue works very well for this.

  3. #3

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    If you want to paint more realistically shadows should be duller as well as darker. We have two main options for doing reducing the chroma of a paint and that's mixing complements or a grey/neutral grey.

    Contrary to conventional thinking the mixing complements of most violet paints are actually greens, so a green is the first thing to try if you want to try that route. You can use any greens you already have or one that you're mixed yourself.

    With a dark violet there may really be no really viable option but to use black, depending on what other paints you have since if you use a light green the shadow mixture might end up lighter than you want.

    Einion

  4. #4

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    color theory states to add yellow. i always add golden yellow to my darker purples when im darkening areas. it provides a natural tone that lends nicely to the realism of the affect you are trying to get.
    Brushlicking is the miniature painting equivalent of a rock'n'roll life-style!

    Here is my ranking:

  5. #5

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    Thank you everyone. I did notice that on my color wheel they are showing yellow as a compliment, but I figured that would make more of muddy color, which I guess actually makes sense, since shadows are going to be duller and almost without color anyway.

  6. #6

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    A color called 'dioxine purple' is a REAL dark purple.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by uberdark View Post
    color theory states to add yellow.
    No, traditional or conventional colour theory* does. For a start that is a suggestion - always remember, irrespective of whether something is the opposite hue (a visual complement) it might very well not be a mixing complement. But the actual opposite hue to Yellow is Blue (violet-blue)**.

    *Read: out of date.

    **With a full colour wheel you get correct oppositions - Green must face Magenta for example, not red. But a wheel of either type shows that a colour wheel's predictive value for this kind of mixing behaviour is poor, since in neither do all paints of opposite hue mix to neutral grey or black. Nowhere is this clearer than with Blue and Yellow, which will always give a green; but there are many other illustrations.

    Einion

  8. #8

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    This is like another language to me. Whenever I think I understand some of the color theory stuff I'm quickly reminded I don't.

    At the moment my best logic is to add whatever I think makes the least sense apparently and that will have a better chance of giving me what I'm looking for than thinking it through Is there a color theory site for simpletons I could start with?

    Thank you to the wiser people who answer these things though!

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Scherdy View Post
    Is there a color theory site for simpletons I could start with?
    The problem is that writing on the subject can be made simple or it can be accurate, but not both (to paraphrase something from one of the Munsell books).

    Colour theory and practical colour applications, like paint mixing, were in the past often assumed to be the same and many books and published guides still write as though they are. But experience quickly shows us that theory and practice very often do not coincide - only a single exception is needed to prove this but there are loads of exceptions. So really there are two different, but related, topics.

    The best place to learn about colour theory from the ground up is the Handprint site, but it goes into such detail that lots of learners find it off-putting. I'll give you the link but you will probably find it very heavy going. All I can suggest is to read through it, grasp the bits you can now and expect to return to re-read and digest more with future visits.

    Einion

  10. #10

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    I've had some success with using VJ Smoke mixed with VJ Royal Purple, and at times I've added in some VJ Cad Red. It isn't based on anything scientific, I just like the way it comes out.

  11. #11

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    Great site Einion. Thanks a ton...well I guess I know what I'll be reading during my spare time over the holiday(s).

  12. #12

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    Thanks for the tip. I did have an idea about maybe adding some red into the mix to richen it up a bit. I'm assuming the VJ stands for Vallejo?



    Quote Originally Posted by Devilry View Post
    I've had some success with using VJ Smoke mixed with VJ Royal Purple, and at times I've added in some VJ Cad Red. It isn't based on anything scientific, I just like the way it comes out.

  13. #13

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    VJ is indeed Vallejo

    Just make sure it's a rich dark red like Cad red and not a mid red like GW Red Gore, or even Scab red as I tend to find they turn the purple quite pink.

  14. #14

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    I was thinking one of these two would work very nicely.. Either the VMC Cad umber red, or the black red. Possibly the violet red.






    Quote Originally Posted by Devilry View Post
    VJ is indeed Vallejo

    Just make sure it's a rich dark red like Cad red and not a mid red like GW Red Gore, or even Scab red as I tend to find they turn the purple quite pink.

  15. #15

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    Hey,

    I'm currently painting a model with a purple cape.

    The basecoat was done with Liche Purple. The shadows were done with adding a little bit of nauseating blue(and older paint) and then i added some codex grey and black mix(codex to desaturate the colour and black to darken) And then just kept adding black.

    I woudl show pictures, but as i went to take one he fell of and landed on another model which was being superglued! so he now has superglue on him and i have to fix that. He will be posted on my account hopefully in december if you are interested.

    Cheerio, Gary.

  16. #16

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    This http://painting.about.com/cs/paintin.../a/shadows.htm
    Is another good source for info that I have found.

    I took books out from the library about color and still have that site bookmarked from Einion way back when I first posted the wrong color wheel info. I found it fascinating it helped a load so thanks again Einion

    I also think trial and error helps as well as a rich dark green for the purple.
    Painting your own a color wheel is a place to start playing around also.I am being been taught that color comes with time, mix and play and test and after a while you remember what worked and what did not so by instinct you grab the right thing, I let you know when that happens.
    I have found I learn more about mixing paint by doing canvas painting you need loads more paint so your forced to learn.

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