Is this a good airbrush?
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Thread: Is this a good airbrush?

  1. #1

    Default Is this a good airbrush?

    So, i've read through some stuff on the forums, and was wondering if this was a good airbrush.

    http://www.dickblick.com/products/te...rbrush-system/

    I was thinking the nozzle may be too big, however buying one of the smaller nozzles shouldn't be a problem.

    so.. What do yah think guys?

    Gary.

  2. #2
    Coffin Dodger / Keymaster airhead's Avatar
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    The Aztec is not my cup of tea, but good results can be had from it.
    For basecoating / clearcoating, that might work.

    The compresser there is crap.

    If you are worried about noise, get an airbrush type diaphragm compressor (1/5 HP, .5-1 cfm @ 30 psi, max about 40 psi *more is better).

    Something like this:
    http://www.dickblick.com/products/ba...s-compressors/

    You don't say what part of the world you are in. Here in FL, moisture traps are a must, (I run one at the compressor, and another one at my manifold).
    http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1...atalogId=10053
    (which starts making the handyman compressors look better financially).


    If not worried about noise, get a small home handyman type compressor. You'll find lots more uses from it. See if you can run it before you buy it. There are 1/2 to 3/4 HP models that are fairly quiet and ones that will rattle the fillings in your teeth for about the same price.
    http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1...atalogId=10053


    ****

    I'm not pushing a particular compressor here, just a style. You can probably shop around (Home Depot, Lowes, Sears) and find a decent deal.

    A quick look at Sears Closeout and I found a 1 HP, 125 psi max for less than $100
    add that with this:
    http://www.bearair.com/Aztek-4308-Se...ctinfo/100258/
    Add the tan fine line nozzle to do some finer work.

    For about the same price...
    Last edited by airhead; 12-23-2009 at 03:45 PM.
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  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by obsidianpainting
    I was thinking the nozzle may be too big, however buying one of the smaller nozzles shouldn't be a problem.
    The high-flow nozzle is a bit much for painting minis, but of course a lot depends on how you're hoping/intending to use it - that's actually one of the main questions.

    As has been mentioned before, once the atomisation is fine enough that's basically good enough, as long as you're not aiming to specifically airbrush detail (i.e. spray highlights or shadows in place, fold by fold). Of course the total amount of paint being sprayed is also important and you'll waste a lot with a wide spray cone if you're just shooting a single 28mm mini.

    If you're looking at Azteks specifically, the sets mentioned in a couple of the recent threads here on airbrushes are well worth considering since you get multiple nozzles to try against each other straight from the box, plus numerous paint cups/jars to help make colour changes less hassle.

    Einion

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by airhead View Post

    If not worried about noise, get a small home handyman type compressor. You'll find lots more uses from it. See if you can run it before you buy it. There are 1/2 to 3/4 HP models that are fairly quiet and ones that will rattle the fillings in your teeth for about the same price.
    http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1...atalogId=10053
    With the sears/home depot shop compressors does oil lubricated or oil free make a difference when it comes to using an airbrush with them?

    With either one you would use a moisture trap and external regulator right?

    Besides one being less maintenance as far as being mindful about the oil lubrication is one more or less of a concern when looking for a small shop compressor for airbrushing?

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Scherdy View Post
    With the sears/home depot shop compressors does oil lubricated or oil free make a difference when it comes to using an airbrush with them?

    With either one you would use a moisture trap and external regulator right?

    Besides one being less maintenance as far as being mindful about the oil lubrication is one more or less of a concern when looking for a small shop compressor for airbrushing?
    I'm pretty sure I read somewhere that with oil based lubrication, there's a chance of having oil contaminants in your line. This can be fixed by using a filter/moisture trap. Reason i say I read is because I don't actually own an airbrush but have been doing some research on the side since I'm planning on getting one.

  6. #6
    Coffin Dodger / Keymaster airhead's Avatar
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    Oil lubed compressors:
    They do run quiter, but you need a good moisture trap/separator.
    Run forever.
    Think of the old compressor at the garage/gas station. Runs off & on all day long - every day.

    Oil-less compressors:
    tend to be noiser.
    You still need a moisture trap. (I use two here in FL...One at the compressor, one at the manifold.)
    Tend to be more of the home use/portable type compressor.

    !!!!
    EXCEPTION:
    Rotary compressors:
    These are the very quiet compressors - and very expensive.
    They are based on the same compressors you have in your fridgerator or air conditioner.
    Last edited by airhead; 12-24-2009 at 04:45 PM.
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  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Eggroll View Post
    I'm pretty sure I read somewhere that with oil based lubrication, there's a chance of having oil contaminants in your line.
    I think that's possible but I wouldn't necessarily worry about it. Maybe airhead will have more input on the likelihood or not but FWIW I have an oil-filled compressor and I've never experienced the problem.

    Einion

  8. #8
    Coffin Dodger / Keymaster airhead's Avatar
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    I've never painted off of an oil-lubed compressor. Used a rather large one at a plant I worked at. We also had in-line oilers for the equipment that we ran off of it. The opposite of a moisture trap... Fill the bowl up with oil and as the tool runs, it pulls little bits of oil into the line to lube the equipment.

    Used for things like impact drivers and sanders.


    ****

    Back to the topic at hand as Enion and I posted at about the same time:
    The only small oil-lubed compressors I am familiar with should not be a problem with painting. You still have to have a moisture trap / oil separator coming off the tank. Most of them only require a drop or two of oil a week with near constant use..
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