Decent Synthetic Brush
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Thread: Decent Synthetic Brush

  1. #1

    Default Decent Synthetic Brush

    Can anyone suggest a decent synthetic brush?
    I have used Loew-Cornell, and they basically suck. They lose their tip in a couple minutes.
    Reaper Synthetic, better than Cornell, but still lose their shape pretty fast.
    Vallejo Toray, The best so far, but I would like to find better. Also they are hard to find.
    I found out recently that P3 hobby brushes are synthetic, and bought one yesterday hopefully it is better or equal to Vallejo.

    Anyone know of any other synthetic brand that are decent?

    I won't use natural fiber brushes because of animal rights issues. All the animal used to make brushes are skinned. Click on link for a sappy sad picture of what makes a sable brush. http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...inter_2002.jpg

  2. #2

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    Jennifer Haley for the same reason recommended some on some site....can't seem to find the link right now

    maybe someone else can recommend one?

    Sanjay

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lennon
    Anyone know of any other synthetic brand that are decent?
    Well decent and good, which is what I think you really want, are two separate things.

    Far as I know all synthetic rounds won't hold a sharp point over time. I've had this happen with just a single use. But you can get used to the hooked tip and it can become useful (see prior threads with tips).

    Quote Originally Posted by Lennon
    I won't use natural fiber brushes because of animal rights issues.
    You're SOL then, sorry! They're head and shoulders above any synthetic in the point-holding department. Capillary action and spring are usually significantly better too.

    Einion

  4. #4

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    Sorry to say that Sable is the best kind of brush you can get. Synthetics can never be as good.

  5. #5

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    I think this is a point where some clever biochemists could make a lot of money. With all the advances in genetics and skin grafting techniques I would have thought that it would be easy to culture weasel skin (along with hair) and make it grow as long as you wanted it. That way nothing would be killed (not even the weasel for the DNA sample, as it could be released back into the wild).

    They can grow human ears on the back of mice and also make them glow in the dark (the glow in the dark technique received the Nobel prize as the it can and has been used as a marker device in biological cells/systems). How about some research into saving some animals from having to be killed for a change. It would also be great PR for people who are usually testing on animals to have a project titled "creating real fur without killing animals".

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by doyme
    I think this is a point where some clever biochemists could make a lot of money. With all the advances in genetics and skin grafting techniques I would have thought that it would be easy to culture weasel skin (along with hair) and make it grow as long as you wanted it. .
    One word: demand.

    Einion

  7. #7

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    Hi Lennon, I suspect your best bet would be to not waste money on expensively branded synthetics but instead to pick up a bucketload cheaply. Use them for as long as they're pointy then chop them up to use as tufts of basing grass

    How dextrous are you? With the joys of the internet perhaps it would be possible to learn how to make your own brushes? Would roadkill be an acceptable source of material? Local zoo? Or perhaps it's time for a new pet!

    Cheers, B.
    My CMON Gallery Rank...

  8. #8

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    i like the vallejo ones but not sure if they are synthetic
    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v433/freak-in-a-cage/freakinacage-1.jpg

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by BPI View Post

    How dextrous are you? With the joys of the internet perhaps it would be possible to learn how to make your own brushes? Would roadkill be an acceptable source of material? Local zoo? Or perhaps it's time for a new pet!

    Cheers, B.
    I see what you did there......




  10. #10

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    I thought horse hair brushes were just taken from horse tails!


    I've chosen my side.


  11. #11

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    It sounds like you've tried many of the synthetics. Unfortunately, in my experience, all of the artist grade synthetics are about the same. I suggest trying some of the ones from Hobby Lobby (Russel Simmons and others) and Michaels (Loew Cornell and others) when they go on their 50% off sale. Once you find some that work okay, then buy several of them when they are on sale.

  12. #12

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    Sounds like your sensibilities, and I can respect that, are locking you into using brushes that will never stack up to the quality of good Kolinsky Sable brushes. Kinda like driving a old Volkswagon when you could drive a brand new Maserati.
    Just resign yourself to replacing your brushes very frequently...sad but true.

  13. #13

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    Einion - it's not about demand...it's actually wisdom/cost.

    THe cost to start up for that research is high. The demand is there for good brushes (well anything really). But no one wants to setup the research to make them in another way since it's easier to get it the way they do now.

    Just look at the responses in this thread for that lack

    I use both..synthetic and natural...my synthetics seemed to be ok after some uses but over time curled, but i then got used to painting with them. hehe I can check which brand they are...I remember something called Taklon, but not sure why... I need to find that J Haley article. The synthetics she was using were expensive she said, but very good.

    Sanjay

  14. #14

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    What I meant was there's not enough demand.

    Take the situation with pigments: we all know how much more is used in artists' paints, craft paints, hobby paints and so on than bristles in brushes, right?

    But that 'huge' market is actually a tiny fraction (literally) of the world market for pigments, which is largely geared towards plastics, industrial coatings and printing inks. So despite what appears to us to be a very large demand from artists/hobbyists for pigments it's actually irrelevant and if industrial demand for something drops the pigment stops being produced (like with Benzimidazolone Maroon and Quinacridone Burnt Orange, when it fell out of favour as an automotive colour).

    Quote Originally Posted by StarFyre
    ...I remember something called Taklon, but not sure why...
    Golden taklon are the yellowish synthetic bristles, a type of nylon.

    Einion

  15. #15

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    I've used taklon for a few years. They are pretty good, although I do have one that has a hook (which I like to use for some hard to reach areas). They were fairly inexpensive, and a reasonable quality. I do have some more expensive sable, that are better quality than the taklon and do have better paint capacity and flow control.

  16. #16

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    Nothing beats natural hair. You get good control, good paint flow and the brushes, if taken care of, last a good while. That being said, I like my loew-cornell brushes, and I got a shwach of em'. Yeah, they do bend at the tip, but that's the way it works. I have learned to accept it and work with it. I also take good care of them and clean/condition them regularly which extends their life quite abit; not to mention that the hook takes longer to form. Once the brush is to coarse to use, I do all my dirty painting chores with them!

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