WIP SENMM Necrons- First Time NMM please help.
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Thread: WIP SENMM Necrons- First Time NMM please help.

  1. #1

    Lightbulb WIP SENMM Necrons- First Time NMM please help.

    A little back story to this project first.

    When I first started WH40k I wanted to get into an army that nobody else was playing. At the time we were in fourth edition and I wanted to give my army a unique look. I concocted a plan to mix some green paint, ink, ect into a metallic color to give a green metallic look, and it worked nicely. I have been given a lot of compliments for this army by people I play with. I painted without listening to the advice of anyone else, in order to see if I could figure it out on my own (purely for the purposes of fun, mind you.) I am happy to say I learned a few tricks on my own. After a bit I became satisfied with how much I learned on my own and started actively seeking out the advice of my betters (much like I am doing here )

    Years later, I find my painting skills at a much higher level. While I am happy that I proved you can paint crons in an interesting fashion I want to take that to the next highest level. This is my first attempt to paint an entire model in NMM. I have had much success with flat surfaces on the few tanks I have attempted this with. I have read many articles recently to help in my attempt and have decided to go with the Sky-Earth brand of thought for Non-Metal Metallic painting.
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    I took the above picture to figure out where I am going to highlight. Every place you see a shine I plan an putting an off-green white shine. As you can see I am going for a green NMM army, however there are details within that green that I wish to add. (Namely some gold plates to insert some Necron runes.) Currently my problems seem to lie in having chalky effects, however after re-reading several articles I found that my problem was that I was contrasting my blending too high, and not using the base coat to contrast, which will be fixed.

    Does anyone know a good way to keep highly watered-down paint in place without it traveling anywhere? another problem I am having is that when I put a watered coat down, I am having it travel on it's own everywhere. Perhaps I am putting it on too thick?

    When I put in a plate (say on the leg) would it be advisable to outline it in black? So far I am finding that the only way to best contrast it.

    To give you guys an idea of what I am going for, on the above model I plan to shade to a lighter green on the tops and bottoms, with an off-white sheen where you see the light reflecting on the model. I plan to highlight the bottom portions of each rib where it would hit the sun with the same off-white. (You can see some sections by looking at the dull shine on the place I am talking about in the ribcage.)

    I am going to make the shoulderpads NMM Bronze with some runes inlaid on the flat surface on the back. The joints I am going to do NMM chrome. On the eyes I hope to do a blue with the blue light reflecting on the outer edges of the eyeballs. The Rod is going to be a clear blue, but I need advice on how to get a smooth coat of clear blue acrylic paint on that rod. (Model Masters Clear Blue is what I am using.)

    Will hopefully have progress pics up in a week or so if the camera is willing to cooperate

  2. #2

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    This is my second attempt at NMM Green on this model. As you can see, I have a long way to go. I will be making a third attempt on this model soonish. I am nowhere near satisfied with the way this looks, even if it does look better outside this pic.
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    Any suggestions at all are very welcome indeed. The weathering on the faceplate is WIP BTW, that's not the finished product.

  3. #3

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    i would suggest thinning your paints more. that will allow you to build up your blends more smoothly
    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v433/freak-in-a-cage/freakinacage-1.jpg

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by SpectralDragon View Post
    Does anyone know a good way to keep highly watered-down paint in place without it traveling anywhere? another problem I am having is that when I put a watered coat down, I am having it travel on it's own everywhere. Perhaps I am putting it on too thick?
    It sounds like your overloading your brush with liquid. When painting with really watered down paints, you want to be painting with a damp brush, not a wet one.

    Try wiping off most of the watered down paint from your brush before applying it to the model.

    Also, when you put the paint onto the model, aim to push the paint to where you want it with the brush.

    Hope that helps!
    Last edited by skraaal; 09-30-2010 at 02:49 AM.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by skraaal View Post
    It sounds like your overloading your brush with liquid. When painting with really watered down paints, you want to be painting with a damp brush, not a wet one.

    Try wiping off most of the watered down paint from your brush before applying it to the model.

    Also, when you put the paint onto the model, aim to push the paint to where you want it with the brush.

    Hope that helps!
    Hello Skraaal,

    I hadn't thought to only make the brush damp, this should help a ton! (I feel stupid for not thinking of that, oh well.) I'll get this down eventually, and when I do there will (hopefully) be some awesome Necrons to show off!

  6. #6

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    hi,

    if you're going for the nmm look trie using stronger contrast colours. (the dark parts should be darker and the highlights more brighter)

  7. #7

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    Hi SpectralDragon, just a personal preference but for army figs in particular I'd work on neat, clean, smooth, sharply edged basecoats before any blending/shading/highlighting. You'll build up your familiarity with the model, paints & brushes as you go, putting you in a stronger position to then work on more advanced techniques. Plus you'll end up with a neat looking force to throw on the table & get games played, which, after all, is what it's generally about

    Cheers, B.
    My CMON Gallery Rank...

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by SpectralDragon View Post
    Hello Skraaal,

    I hadn't thought to only make the brush damp, this should help a ton! (I feel stupid for not thinking of that, oh well.) I'll get this down eventually, and when I do there will (hopefully) be some awesome Necrons to show off!
    Also, when doing this, make sure to have the paint REALLY watered down. Like 10:1 wateraint. You'll need to go over the area many times, but in the end you'll get a really nice effect.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by BPI View Post
    Hi SpectralDragon, just a personal preference but for army figs in particular I'd work on neat, clean, smooth, sharply edged basecoats before any blending/shading/highlighting. You'll build up your familiarity with the model, paints & brushes as you go, putting you in a stronger position to then work on more advanced techniques. Plus you'll end up with a neat looking force to throw on the table & get games played, which, after all, is what it's generally about

    Cheers, B.
    Part of the reason I am doing this is, well, have you seen any NMM necrons about? :P

    I have a fully painted necron army, actually. http://www.warseer.com/forums/showthread.php?t=177793 and I am proud of it, however I wish to take it to the next step now. Currently the thing with my necrons is the paint is mixed in a way which makes a dull mithril silver shine through that green when the light reflects at certain angles, much like a duller version of the white shine effect on NMM, but subtle.

    Thanks for all the advice guys, will try to post some progress shots by Wednesday.

  10. #10
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    As has been said, water water water! Lots of thin layers effect the best results. Also follow Locitus' advice steel NMM can easily range from pitch black to pure white, contrast is NMMs bread and butter. Luckily, my first and only attempt was steadily guided by Orb and a few others in the forums and CMoN chat (ah I miss that), I have to say it turned out quite well, all things considered! One piece of advice from this that I will pass on is that reeeaaally thin glazes can work wonders for a bit of NMM. It really ties it together and helps you attain the hue you desire.
    Happy dabbling and good luck!

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