GW Foundation Paints may not be safe to 'eat'
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Thread: GW Foundation Paints may not be safe to 'eat'

  1. #1

    Default GW Foundation Paints may not be safe to 'eat'

    I have been licking my brush with these paints now. I just realised today that unlike the main range which are stated to be non toxic and are made in the EU, these have a different label and are made in China.

    I googled the label and found the following:

    http://www.ehow.com/facts_5004792_what-astm-d.html (see the misconceptions section esp)

    Ok, so there's no list of dangerous chemicals on the label, but frankly I wouldn't trust anything made in China to be safe.

    I bought a PA system made in China, and it broke down at my first band practise. The company I bought it from replaced it with a new one, and that broke down on first use as well!
    Not to mention the owner of the local garage told me not to buy a Chinese bike, since they have been known to fall apart in transit!

    Anyway, now I have to train myself not to lick the brush

  2. #2

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    gw paints are made in france arent they?

  3. #3

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    Yeh, except the foundation stuff..

    Its pretty safe to assume eating any kind of paint is bad... I'm pretty sure the other stuff wont be amazing for the human internals either..

  4. #4

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    you've tasted foundation paint right? foul stuff. stop licking!
    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v433/freak-in-a-cage/freakinacage-1.jpg

  5. #5

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    In general, never eat paint. Licking the brush ain't the smartes trick in the book.

    Even if GW-paints are said to be non-toxic, you could still get allergic reactions. There are no declaration on the cans of what pigment is used, so it could be some nasty stuff there. One thing is for sure though... acrylics are cancerogenic. They also contain ammonia and formaldehyde (in very small amounts, but still not substances you want to eat!).

    I'll link to a very good site, from Princeton University. It is their 'Art Safety Training Guide'. It pretty much covers almost everything you'll encouter in this hobby and more.
    http://web.princeton.edu/sites/ehs/artsafety/sec10.htm

  6. #6

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    freakinacage is soo right. foundation paints are nice, but taste like mcdonalds... just as with the gw metallics or green stuff, i´d count with it being rather unhealthy. the strong taste is usually not bad in itself, but used to make sure the product isnt inhaled or eaten.

  7. #7
    Lost in the desert ChemicalFencer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by montka View Post
    but frankly I wouldn't trust anything made in China to be safe.
    My wife was made in China, does that make her unsafe? ;p

    I remember liking the original Crimson Gore (in the hex bottles - second gen GW paints i think).

    I am a brush licker, although I keep being told I shouldn't. Some paints (some Vallejo paints for example) do contain Cadmium, very very horrible stuff. It accumulates in your body over time (even at low concentrations) and can cause kidney damage and can change the constitution of bone, blood and liver. If I'm using my Vallejo I try my very best not to put the brush anywhere near my mouth.

    CF

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by montka
    I have been licking my brush with these paints now. I just realised today that unlike the main range which are stated to be non toxic and are made in the EU, these have a different label and are made in China.
    I think you might have a misconception about what non-toxic actually means. It definitely doesn't mean it's safe to ingest. The toxicity ratings for products relate to their intended use - there are plenty of "non-toxic" products that are genuinely safe, long as you aren't ingesting them, inhaling them or getting them on your skin with any regularity. Each of those applies to hobby and artists' paints of all types.


    Quote Originally Posted by ChemicalFencer
    My wife was made in China, does that make her unsafe? ;p


    Quote Originally Posted by ChemicalFencer
    I am a brush licker, although I keep being told I shouldn't. Some paints (some Vallejo paints for example) do contain Cadmium, very very horrible stuff. It accumulates in your body over time (even at low concentrations) and can cause kidney damage and can change the constitution of bone, blood and liver. If I'm using my Vallejo I try my very best not to put the brush anywhere near my mouth.
    Although metal salts (like cadmium sulphate) shouldn't be equated with the heavy metal itself the basic safety message is right on the money. And there are plenty more heavy metals to worry about: selenium, chromium, cobalt, copper and aluminium are all fairly commonly seen amongst pigments.

    ...

    As I've cautioned in the past, acrylic or vinyl paints have more potential hazards in them than just the obvious thing, the pigments. They're chemical soups, with anti-foaming agents, flow improvers, stabilizers and bacteriocides among the numerous hidden ingredients... really want to be putting all that into direct contact with a mucous membrane?

    Pointing brushing in the mouth should be studiously avoided if you care about your health.

    Einion

  9. #9
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    Soooo...Basically it's cool as long as you aren't farting glitter. Gotchya.
    I have a cunning plan...So cunning you could pin a tail on it and call it a Weasel...

  10. #10

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    I have a question:

    what actually constitutes brush-licking? Clearly brush-in-mouth would be a key step, but does it matter if there's paint on the brush?

    e.g. what I do:

    put brush in paint.
    wipe off some paint on tissue.
    apply paint to mini
    wash brush in water pot
    put brush in mouth to get a point on it.

    repeat X a bajillion

    Is that brushlicking, or is that like, only...wussy, girly brush licking? Do real brushlickers put their brush in the paint then straight into their mouths to point the brush?

  11. #11
    Lost in the desert ChemicalFencer's Avatar
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    I'm like you and I think most brush lickers are the same, but can you be sure that there is nothing on the brush?

    However, I have seen one painter use his lip as a pallet - different shades of green. He was a 'eavy Metal team painter at Games Day one year painting a Wood Elf character.

    CF

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by ChemicalFencer View Post
    I'm like you and I think most brush lickers are the same, but can you be sure that there is nothing on the brush?

    However, I have seen one painter use his lip as a pallet - different shades of green. He was a 'eavy Metal team painter at Games Day one year painting a Wood Elf character.

    CF
    That does strike me as a little "unique"...

    Tend to point the brush with my mouth when I need to do finer work (e.g. eyes). Generally with a decent brush, they tend to maintain the point fairly well without. Plus the better half hassles me if she sees me with a brush jammed between my lips I do however lick my fingers/sculpting tools when doing anything in green stuff as I find that it's far more effective than neat water or Vaseline.

  13. #13

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    I used to brush lick a lot, but ive found a damp kitchen towel works just as well for getting a point.

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by me_in_japan
    I have a question:

    what actually constitutes brush-licking? Clearly brush-in-mouth would be a key step, but does it matter if there's paint on the brush?

    e.g. what I do:

    put brush in paint.
    wipe off some paint on tissue.
    apply paint to mini
    wash brush in water pot
    put brush in mouth to get a point on it.

    repeat X a bajillion
    I think that would be fairly typical, yes.

    Quote Originally Posted by RuneBrush
    I do however lick my fingers/sculpting tools when doing anything in green stuff as I find that it's far more effective than neat water or Vaseline.
    You can use saliva without having to put the tool in your mouth (hint, hint). Kneadatite is actually what got me out of the habit of doing this myself, since I noticed a definite aftertaste that wasn't at all pleasant.

    Other things to try if you haven't already: moisturiser, conditioner and washing-up liquid.

    Einion

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    Or KY jelly. Comes off nearly instantly when cured and washed. Handy stuff.
    I have a cunning plan...So cunning you could pin a tail on it and call it a Weasel...

  16. #16

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    It's just sharpening the point I'm after when I do it. I think I'll have to go with the damp towel from now on too.

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