Beautiful Hunter and kickstarter opinions.
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  1. #1
    Member kaeyous's Avatar
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    Default Beautiful Hunter and kickstarter opinions.

    We all have to eat. You need to do what you need to do to attract prey. New miniature from Kaeyous miniatures. Work in progress.

    If you are going to reply to this thread. Please also let me know your feelings about all this kickstarter craze.What would you think are the "do's and don'ts" of a successful campaign. Thanks in advance for your comments.
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    Brushlicker Milosh's Avatar
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    great concept, but totally creepy because I hate spiders, even ones with nice boobs. It is very well crafted, you have some great talent. I'm going to get that PM to you on Sunday.



    Kickstarter can be good if you have a solid product and solid plan. I think many of the recent projects have lost focus on what made the early ones the cash. They are getting greedy, like kingdom death is. Instead of adding in stretch goals as rewards they are making them available to purchase. It is the main reason I won't back kingdom death. You have to be ready to give product away at near cost and have a hell of a product to begin with. You have a good start with your design work, you just gotta figure out how to produce them at a reasonable cost.
    Last edited by Milosh; 12-01-2012 at 11:48 PM.

  3. #3

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    I think Kickstarter can be good, but really it may not be necessary in this case. There are a handful of 3D printing services that will print a run for you at a reasonable cost. If you had a half a dozen or so models with some printed in stock, you could sell from your own website. Yes, it would require you put some cash up front for a future return, but there are lots of us who scan the net everyday looking for new, cool, and UNIQUE scuplts that you probably would be able to sell enough independently. Your sculpt is so creepy and hot in a (wierd way), it would sell well given time (time to circulate rep, etc.). Write a business plan that includes the cost of a 3D print run, and then if you can keep your models between $10 and $20, you will make money.

  4. #4

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    Interesting minis creepy but interesting.

    I was a supporter for Kingdom of Death but they started to head down that path of lets get to $XXX,XXX amount and you CAN then BUY X mini for $XX.
    it escalates your original pledge from $80 to $275USD in a heart beat.
    What I want to know is with regards to your minis are there rules for them? a Skirmish game? Dungeon Crawl? how would I utilize them? are they just some thing to collect?

    I don't want something that just sits on a shelf gathering dust I want a mini I can play against my mates with.
    have your goals planed know how much you can afford to give away. make each goal relate to all backers and not just the TOP DOGS [eg those at the upper most pledge levels]
    as it leaves the smaller backers feeling left out.

    Have back up goals incase your original 12 were blown away by backers.
    be willing to alter or change a goal if the current backers either give you a better idea or they cry out that the goal offered isnt good enough.
    Know your competing against previous Kickstarter projects that have offered big and delivered big don't think you have to be like them.
    If your going to deliver this game in June then do so or let the backers know whats going on. 2 months with no communication is very bad form.
    Regular communications during and AFTER the Kickstarter has ended is paramount to keeping your backers happy [1 update a week/fortnight is a good place to start even if its just to say hi and All is going well] Backers would prefer to here bad news rather then NO news.
    On your main page use an Image to set out what the main pledge level offers. then up date that image with all of the new goals that have been achieved.
    POSTAGE be upfront if its expensive then let the backers know.
    Try and have country postage sorted out before you go live. Your going to get asked if you will ship from the U.K or the U.S so those backers from the U.K/EU don't get charged huge amounts in import costs. this WILL increase pledge amounts if its sorted from day one. get distributors for the U.K/U.S/and EU

    well I hope these above mentioned ramblings help looking forward to your next model.

    LGW

  5. #5

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    I have to echo what these guys have said - KS can be a great way to get some up front capital but it has to be handled right. See Zombicide, Reaper or even Sedition Wars for good examples of how to keep people pledging.
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  6. #6

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    See Zombicide, Reaper or even Sedition Wars for good examples of how to keep people pledging.
    lol. awful advice. copying a KS run by a large established miniatures company like CMON or reaper that has existing capital and an already successful business is a recipe for disaster.

    a big company may be able to offer free stuff as stretch goals, but a small company? you will just drive them in to the ground. most of the little guys have taken notice and that is why stretch goals unlock minis (pays for the sculpts and the molds, barely), but why you still have to pay for them. free stuff only works as a KS model if your production numbers are so large that you see a drop in production cost per model because of a bulk order. all of the companies that have been listed above have done bulk factory production in CHINA to get those deals. if a company is hoping for a few hundred backers at best (realistic for a start-up) there is no way that can happen. this is why you see a lot more "pay for x" stretch goals, and if you are over "Y" you get a free model. miniatures production is a game of margins, and those margins are very tight. if you are a "big" company like reaper or coolmini (with accountants), that can take a big hit if things go wrong and keep chugging, free stretch goals are fine. if not, you are playing a dangerous game with other peoples money.

    to those of you applauding the free stretch goal model, really consider what you are promoting. i, personally, am happy to pay more for a quality product line that appeals to me that is MFGd domestically to help a small company grow.

    @ the OP. be wary of KS - they take a big chunk (there goes your margin). it is a great advertizing platform, and it can bring in a lot of cash, but it is a temporary pulse. many smaller companies that had successful KS campaigns are struggling because they put all that money in to the biz and expected the sales to keep rolling in, but they didn't (probably because of other KS projects and no deals). now they financed a line and have no shoppers and a looming problem. better to let the line grow naturally if you have a "day job." get some fans and customers, then launch the KS once you are a bit established.

    if you want a red cent from me, you need more than just pretty pictures, you have to convince me you can actually hold up your end of the bargain.
    Last edited by funnymouth; 12-02-2012 at 12:16 PM.

  7. #7
    Member kaeyous's Avatar
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    Hello Guys. Thank you for your kind comments and useful information.

    Milosh: Looking forward to that PM.

    Phaedrus: That is a good option. I was thinking using ks for a very small upfront production. Will explain, keep reading below so you can give me your opinion.

    Lord Greywolf: There are no game attached to this. However, I was looking at the Imbrian KS http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/...tures?ref=live and they mentioned that their miniatures can be placed in any RPG. Maybe I can say the same thing. What are your thoughts? If I was to create them for a game, what considerations should I follow? Unfortunately I am not a gamer, I just discovered the world of miniatures and am in awe because of the characters. I just want to do more and more characters!

    TrystanGST: Thank you for your advice I will check them out.

    FunnyMouth: You make a good point. If I want a red cent from you, how can I convince you that I can hold up my end of the bargain? What would you need to see or know about me?

    Everybody:
    1. what do you think about the quality of this 3d printer: http://formlabs.com/products/our-printer
    Do you see any reason why I couldn't sell miniatures that I just print on it? Would you be a satisfied costumer with one of my sculptures on that material?

    2. What is the one thing that a KS... or any line of miniatures have to have in order for you to get it?

    Thank in advance for you answers.

  8. #8

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    @Kaeyous:

    if you don't have any rules then you will need to appeal to the Generic gamer doing minis that they can use for other rule sets, Dungeon and Dragons, Warhammer 40k, Warhammer fantasy battle, Warmachine, pr any other Fantasy or Sci-fi skirmish games.

    Most gamers I know have or are in the process of moving from Large scale gaming to more Skirmish games.
    If you don't know how to make rules for a game find some one who does and get them to write up some rules for you. if your Marketing them as a Dungeon type monsters then look at the D&D range and see where your models can fit.

    For example your female Spider could be used as a Daemon Princess for WH40k, it may appeal to some one who plays that game.
    also look at the scale your making them for. 28mm or have you looked at 15mm scale as you could use them in alot of different games that are out there.

    have a goal and work from there. but having our minis usable would make them more appealing to backers. as for the printing quality it looks good but that could change, and with out actually seeing one of your 3D art actually made it would be hard to tell.

    LGW

  9. #9

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    The problem with printing customers figures for them. Time! A friend of mine was looking at printers and I think that he was looking at an hour to 3 hrs print time for one mini. So yes you could do it, but the cost is going to be on the high side per unit.
    As for your model, what program are you modeling in?
    And I'm not sure I like the rear legs. Look to be hindering fast movement more then again thing. Perhaps more like a 'standard' spider leg with a hint/form of a high heel?
    "Yes, yes, yes. Woman are in awe of his manhood and men swoon in his wake. Truly he is a legend in his own mind."

  10. #10

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    As someone who has invested in a number of kickstarters the most important thing for me (aside from liking the concepts) is to actually see how the printed or cast model looks. 3-D sculpts are great, but I want to know how the product I actually receive will look. If you're an existing company with past work I'm willing to go more on faith. But from someone relatively new I'd really want to see one or two examples before I consider pledging any money to the kickstarter. So, if you want to do this through kickstarter, get something printed first and take some nice high quality pictures of the model. If you can get someone to paint it (or do it yourself) that's great too. But, if you do, make sure it is painted well. A mediocre paint job can do more harm than good.

    My other advice is to look at small scale miniature kickstarters. Yes, right now Kingdom Death has a huge $400,000+ project going. But they've been around for a couple years and have been steadily building a customer base. They already had a lot of fans so that's a big reason why their project blew up like that. Instead I think it would be more helpful to look at their first kickstarter back in 2009.
    http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/...lpted?ref=live
    He was trying to raise money to get one of the early figures sculpted. I think this is a better model to look at and try to base your project on.

    The 3-D printer you showed looks very nice. But factor in both the cost per print and the amount of time. It may be feasible to print off a few dozen models, but I don't think you can do a huge run like that. Seems like most people create a 3-D print and then take that to get a mold made. Using the mold you can make a larger run of plastic or resin figures. If it were me, I'd plan for a small scale kickstarter. Plan for between 25 and 50 3-D prints for your rewards (along with other perks... could be art, pre-painted figures, inclusion in design process, etc). Then set pricing and the goal so that you can cover the costs of the prints (and kickstarter overhead) and raise enough money to make a mold and gear up for casting a larger run of minis.

    I'd also try to contact some people who've run similar successful kickstarters and get their advice. Not everyone will respond, but I imagine some will.

  11. #11

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    The number one thing that I look for when I support a campaign is the sculpts that I'll be backing. Hands down, this is the most important to me. There are people who have great concepts, but that means little without the appeal of the physical models. Considering that sculpting is a form of art it makes the situation very subjective. You could be a great artist, but the context may not be appealing to some, or many. So again, the most important thing is to show what you will be providing. That's when the glory of a KS kicks in. If you have a style that people like, prepare to be bombarded with money.

    The other thing I look for is deals, but it's less important. It's a bit on the self-serving side, but then again, as a backer it's my money and I'm not just going to throw it at a company so that they can make a profit on my own earnings. By deals I typically mean mini's at a cost that's lower than retail, or, limited edition mini's only available to backers. Basically, something that I can get that won't be available outside of the KS campaign which will draw me in to it.

    Lastly, something that can help if done right are painted examples. Painted mini’s are a slippery slope though, so proceed with caution. They need to be done to a good standard or it could work against you. You may have a great looking sculpt but if someone just slaps on a few layers of paint to get something out there, it's going to detract from your prospective buyers funding. On the opposite end of that spectrum, you may not have a model that's appealing to someone, but a smashing paint job could really embellish the desirability of the model and turn someone’s opinion around.

  12. #12
    Member kaeyous's Avatar
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    Hello everybody. Sorry for the late response. Day job has been very thought this week. Hopefully with all of your good advice I will be able to bring you the best miniatures my skills allow me to provide.

    I will put this miniature "on hold" as I want to wrap up another one first. Please follow this post: http://www.coolminiornot.com/forums/...629#post678629

    Thank you again for your advice.

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