Advice for A Beginner?
Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: Advice for A Beginner?

  1. #1

    Default Advice for A Beginner?

    I am planning to try photography next year. I admit, I am not that good in this. But I just love to take photos. Many would say I can capture good photographs and I have the talent in it just to encourage me. I assume there's really nothing wrong if I could try photography since it's something I really love to do. I wanted to ask for some advices and suggestions I could do to push through this kind of passion? For a beginner like me, I know I need to learn lot of things. I don't know where to start so I can be successful at it? I will appreciate all your advices. Thank you!

  2. #2

    Default

    Something that surprised me not so long ago was that most digital cameras don't have many options you can control. Which means, even if it's a great little camera, you might not be able to get it to take pictures in the way you need. It probably isn't an issue if you've got a large budget for a higher end SLR (digital or otherwise) but for the non-SLR cameras, it's an issue. I got a Nikon Coolpix, for example, which works amazing for %99.99 of anything I'll ever use it for (although I probably could have saved some coin on a Canon A series...or a couple other manufacturers...but I digress). It's got more "settings" than I can count, but I can't tweak the set-up to get clear pictures of rain drops or optimize things for any situation. So, if it is something you never knew, like me, keep that in mind when shopping around for a camera. Also, I got a Joby tripod (one of those flexible ones) and it's got no stabilization what so ever. No matter how tight you wrap the legs around something, it tends to move the camera when the button is pushed. So, with a delay it might work well for some folk, but I expected more.

    I've long since lost all the websites I had bookmarked for photography and cameras, but there are tons of them out there. It is a fairly popular activity, after all. So you can try doing a web search for instructions and tips and settings, etc. Include the type or subject matter you'd like to photograph for a more specific set of results. You're guaranteed to find answers quickly, just make sure to cross reference your results, like with anything online, you never know how reliable anything is.

  3. #3

    Default

    Also a beginner photographer here
    My bf got me a Canon PowerShot, which has been awesome for almost everything --- EXCEPT shooting models, haha. I've found it doesn't focus on close-ups, despite having fantastic zoom capabilities. I think I might need an additional lens for those close up shots? The only way I can get around it is to take pictures from further back and then zoom/crop the pics on my pic. The pics are good enough quality that I end up with decent close-ups, but it's kind of a hassle... any recommendations?

  4. #4

    Default

    If you really want to get into doing photografing, I defenetly suggest a camera with RAW format and a big enough sensor to get good quality picutures (NOT talking megapixels here) it is about the sensor size wheree the picture is capture that is important, also that there is good lenses available.

    /Kretcher

  5. #5

    Default

    As I wrote in a thread yesterday, I would suggest buying something bigger like a nikon (canon, sony or other brands would do just as fine) digital SLR camera and with that a 50mm 1.8f lens. This will get you the option to take photos of minis or pretty much what every you like, especially if you are getting into photography as a hobby. I use this setup for almost everything like minis, portraits, scenery, action shots and more... I just love it. You should be able to find a used one that's not the latest model for cheap $'s.

    My self owns a D5100 but any of these cameras (d40, d60, d90, d3100 etc etc) would do just fine as you can set it up in any way you like. The 50mm lens if a good choice for the minis as it's very light sensitive and can get a focus length that would give the whole a model a clear sharp focus.

    This is an example of the camera on a tripod and almost no lighting.... so it could improve in so many ways.

  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by QuietiManes View Post
    Something that surprised me not so long ago was that most digital cameras don't have many options you can control. Which means, even if it's a great little camera, you might not be able to get it to take pictures in the way you need. It probably isn't an issue if you've got a large budget for a higher end SLR (digital or otherwise) but for the non-SLR cameras, it's an issue. I got a Nikon Coolpix, for example, which works amazing for %99.99 of anything I'll ever use it for (although I probably could have saved some coin on a Canon A series...or a couple other manufacturers...but I digress). It's got more "settings" than I can count, but I can't tweak the set-up to get clear pictures of rain drops or optimize things for any situation. So, if it is something you never knew, like me, keep that in mind when shopping around for a camera. Also, I got a Joby tripod (one of those flexible ones) and it's got no stabilization what so ever. No matter how tight you wrap the legs around something, it tends to move the camera when the button is pushed. So, with a delay it might work well for some folk, but I expected more.

    I've long since lost all the websites I had bookmarked for photography and cameras, but there are tons of them out there. It is a fairly popular activity, after all. So you can try doing a web search for instructions and tips and settings, etc. Include the type or subject matter you'd like to photograph for a more specific set of results. You're guaranteed to find answers quickly, just make sure to cross reference your results, like with anything online, you never know how reliable anything is.
    Your advice will surely a big help for me! Thank you so much!

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lani Rae View Post
    Also a beginner photographer here
    My bf got me a Canon PowerShot, which has been awesome for almost everything --- EXCEPT shooting models, haha. I've found it doesn't focus on close-ups, despite having fantastic zoom capabilities. I think I might need an additional lens for those close up shots? The only way I can get around it is to take pictures from further back and then zoom/crop the pics on my pic. The pics are good enough quality that I end up with decent close-ups, but it's kind of a hassle... any recommendations?
    If memory serves, the PowerShot's have a decent macro mode. It should be a little flower icon but check the manual if you don't find it. Macro mode is what you use to get it to focus on things close-up, usually as close as two inches up to about a foot or two, depending on the camera. Zoom won't help it focus, as you've realized, it actually increases the minimum focal range, I think anyway, seems to when I was playing around with it when I got my last camera.

  8. #8

    Default

    Canon G15. Or Canon G1X if you want a bigger sensor.

    Small, no pratting around with (expensive) lenses and full manual control. Master either of those and you'll be able to use any camera.

  9. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Spacemunkie View Post
    Canon G15. Or Canon G1X if you want a bigger sensor.

    Small, no pratting around with (expensive) lenses and full manual control. Master either of those and you'll be able to use any camera.
    Sounds really expensive but I won't doubt it suggests a quality works and that's something I shouldn't be taken for granted. Thank you for your advice!

  10. #10

    Default

    You can always look for a used G9 (or G10, G11 or G12) on EBay. The G9 is still a fantastic camera and you'll get a clean one for less than $200.

  11. #11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Spacemunkie View Post
    You can always look for a used G9 (or G10, G11 or G12) on EBay. The G9 is still a fantastic camera and you'll get a clean one for less than $200.
    $200? That would be fair! I'm gonna have the list of your recommended cam and start looking and budgeting for it. Thanks!

  12. #12

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Anderson112 View Post
    Hello freidns i just want to say about the beginners that A successful photographer starts by getting a camera and learning and mastering every control on that camera. The best camera to learn on is any camera with a decent lens and which allows full manual control, along with any "program" modes it may have. You read the manual from cover-to-cover learning what each control does.
    Thank you Anderson! Actually I have my camera already but of course, I can't say this is the best one. I'm still trying to keep some money to get the best camera for my photography. I hope to get it as early as possible!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Privacy Policy  |   Terms and Conditions  |   Contact Us  |   The Legion


Copyright © 2001-2018 CMON Inc.

-->