Pewter preparation, how do you get rid of pittings ?
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Thread: Pewter preparation, how do you get rid of pittings ?

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    Newbie, please be gentle midas-kensai's Avatar
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    Default Pewter preparation, how do you get rid of pittings ?

    Hi all,

    Tthe recent batch of metal minis came in here, but unfortunately they are of lesser quality (apparently someone wanted to speed up the casting and used more mold release talcum powder than last time ).
    The result are pittings on the surface. I already sanded it down, but there are a number of deeper holes that are rather stubborn.
    How would you get rid of these? 'Tried priming, but they show below the primer. More primer obscures the details of the model. The primer is not sandable.
    'Tried using the milliput milk method with more success, but sanding it down again seems to remove the stuff that covered the holes as well (washed the mini before to get the mold release off ofc).
    Has anyone tried Mr Surfacer for this ? It seems to be the solution here, but I have not used it yet. It is sand-able and it is advertised as being airbrush-able.

    Any suggestions on the grit of Mr Surfacer, 500, 1000 or even 1200? Any general suggestions on using Mr Surfacer?
    Any other suggestions maybe? (please, don't tell me to buy better models)

  2. #2

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    Ever use green stuff? I love that and use it in automobiles and planes all the time.

  3. #3

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    I have tried Mr Surfacer, I have 500 and 1000. It works well and don't really need to sand afterward. If the surface is rough first use 500 then 1000 (or 1200). It worked for me with several layers... But you will have to have an enamel thinner, Tamiya, Mr Hobby, industrial one, etc... It dries really fast so you can prepare your mini quite fast.
    This week end I will try on a Finecast product, hopefully will not dissolve the resin. There is another Mr Surfacer for resin and plastic.

    Good luck.

  4. #4

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    Slightly water down some liquid green stuff.
    "I was too distracted by the ladies to be scared of your bear. That is the second weirdest sentence I have ever typed on this site o_O"- Zab

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    Newbie, please be gentle midas-kensai's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by moetle View Post
    Slightly water down some liquid green stuff.
    But LGS is not sandable. The milliput milk seems superior to it as well.

  6. #6

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    I use a small file on it just fine after it dries. I admit i haven't used sandpaper on it but I've never used sandpaper on anything smaller then 54mm.
    "I was too distracted by the ladies to be scared of your bear. That is the second weirdest sentence I have ever typed on this site o_O"- Zab

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    Superfreak!!! Dragonsreach's Avatar
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    Since I'm as old as thay come, I'll share a tip I learned a long long time ago when we didn't have Greenstuff and Milliput was like hens teeth.
    A drop of PVA glue in the deepest pits and allowed to dry is sandable and smooths out nicely.

    (The tip is courtesy of my Grandads Woodworm/Dent hole filler. PVA and Sawdust.)
    I believe in Karma, what you give, is what you get returned. Affirmation; Savage Garden
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    Sorry to hear about the bad castings.

    Quote Originally Posted by midas-kensai
    How would you get rid of these? 'Tried priming, but they show below the primer. More primer obscures the details of the model. The primer is not sandable.
    What primer are you using? One of my standards for primer is that it should be sandable, for precisely this reason.

    Quote Originally Posted by midas-kensai
    'Tried using the milliput milk method with more success, but sanding it down again seems to remove the stuff that covered the holes as well (washed the mini before to get the mold release off ofc).
    You have to sand gently, and ideally using only quite fine-grit paper; fine Scotchbrite or steel wool may work well for the final smoothing off. What grade of Milliput are you using out of curiosity?

    Regardless of which putty you use there is still a risk of some being pulled out, but you can always apply another coat. One other possibility is that you may not be waiting long enough for the Milliput to fully cure - if you're not speed-curing using heat 24 hours is often not enough, it can be necessary to wait two days or longer for epoxies to get as hard as they're going to get and bond as strongly as they can.

    An alternative way to use any similar epoxy putty for this kind of thing is not to make a slurry with water but to use the putty straight, firmly pressing it into the holes and then smoothing off the surface with a sculpting tool. This method has the advantage that you don't need to sand afterwards so there's no risk of pulling any out of small holes; it's tedious but IMO worth the effort.

    Quote Originally Posted by midas-kensai
    Any suggestions on the grit of Mr Surfacer, 500, 1000 or even 1200?
    Honestly, I'd avoid it for this for two major reasons, the main one being it's expensive as all hell. And unless you're lucky enough to have a local source it's hard to get too. Besides, you can definitely work with what you already have at hand.

    The ideal solution is actually not a fix or technique but to get them replaced - excessive pitting is unacceptable.

    Einion

  9. #9

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    GWs LGS is sandable, I used it on a plastic wight king to smooth over a join line in a cloak.

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    Newbie, please be gentle midas-kensai's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by boubi View Post
    There is another Mr Surfacer for resin and plastic.
    Good luck.
    Yes, it is called Mr Dissolved Putty. And Thanks.
    Quote Originally Posted by Dragonsreach View Post
    Since I'm as old as thay come, I'll share a tip I learned a long long time ago when we didn't have Greenstuff and Milliput was like hens teeth.
    A drop of PVA glue in the deepest pits and allowed to dry is sandable and smooths out nicely.
    (The tip is courtesy of my Grandads Woodworm/Dent hole filler. PVA and Sawdust.)
    Will try. Tip to the hat for your grandfather.
    Quote Originally Posted by Einion View Post
    What primer are you using? One of my standards for primer is that it should be sand-able, for precisely this reason.
    Vallejo PU-primer, the airbrush-able stuff. What do you use?
    Sanding does get it removed, but the transition between the metal and the remaining primer layer is not smooth.
    Quote Originally Posted by Einion View Post
    You have to sand gently, and ideally using only quite fine-grit paper; fine Scotchbrite or steel wool may work well for the final smoothing off. What grade of Milliput are you using out of curiosity?
    Superfine white and up to 1500 grit wet sanding paper. It worked well in the past with smaller flaws. (That's not entirely correct, the flaws were of similar size but less numerous.)
    Quote Originally Posted by Einion View Post
    Regardless of which putty you use there is still a risk of some being pulled out, but you can always apply another coat. One other possibility is that you may not be waiting long enough for the Milliput to fully cure - if you're not speed-curing using heat 24 hours is often not enough, it can be necessary to wait two days or longer for epoxies to get as hard as they're going to get and bond as strongly as they can.
    Hm... will try the longer curing time.
    Quote Originally Posted by Einion View Post
    An alternative way to use any similar epoxy putty for this kind of thing is not to make a slurry with water but to use the putty straight, firmly pressing it into the holes and then smoothing off the surface with a sculpting tool. This method has the advantage that you don't need to sand afterwards so there's no risk of pulling any out of small holes; it's tedious but IMO worth the effort.
    I'd rather not. The entire models surface is covered with those pittings.
    Quote Originally Posted by Einion View Post
    Honestly, I'd avoid it [Mr Surfacer xxxx] for this for two major reasons, the main one being it's expensive as all hell. And unless you're lucky enough to have a local source it's hard to get too. Besides, you can definitely work with what you already have at hand.
    It's available online over here and is actually cheaper than LGS regarding the cost-per-volume-ratio. The scale model guys swear by this stuff. My question was if the 500 or 1000 may already be enough or if it needs to be the fine 1200. Rougher grit having the advantage that you remove more material with one stroke and finer grit needing more passes but being, well, finer in the end.
    Quote Originally Posted by Trevor View Post
    GWs LGS is sandable, I used it on a plastic wight king to smooth over a join line in a cloak.
    I guess I might just spend the 3 bucks and try it out, but Mr Surfacer is explicitly advertised as sand-able and does not need a whole day to cue.
    Last edited by midas-kensai; 01-11-2013 at 10:17 AM. Reason: clean up

  11. #11

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    There's a wide range of modelling fillers for this purpose, such as Humbrol Model Filler, Tamiya or Italeri Putty.







    The way to use it is adding thinner to get to the desired consistency (pore size depending) , and then apply with a brush preferably in several thin layers. Can be sanded after hardening.

    Remember not to use a synthetic brush, as the thinner will dissolve the plastic bristles.

  12. #12

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    I also have one old Italeri putty tube, and it is exactly the same substance as Mr Surfacer 500 1000 1200. Using same thinner.

  13. #13

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    Some of those model fillers aren't (or weren't years ago) great for small scale. I had a tube of Humbrol stuff and it basically was liquid poly mixed with powdered plastic. It was great for filling in big holes but ate fine details and didn't adhere very well to metal - it did sand and drill ok though

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by midas-kensai
    Vallejo PU-primer, the airbrush-able stuff. What do you use?
    Auto primer. Dries hard enough to sand seamlessly, just like Mr. Surfacer.

    Quote Originally Posted by midas-kensai
    I'd rather not. The entire models surface is covered with those pittings.
    Understandable, it's tedious at the best of times.

    The pitting does sound pronounced enough that replacement should be the first thought, we shouldn't have to put up with that kind of sloppy QC.

    Quote Originally Posted by midas-kensai
    It's available online over here and is actually cheaper than LGS regarding the cost-per-volume-ratio.
    That wouldn't be hard

    Einion

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