Vallejo liquid metals and Tmm...
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Thread: Vallejo liquid metals and Tmm...

  1. #1

    Default Vallejo liquid metals and Tmm...

    Hi all,

    about to make the plunge into vlm as never been happy with my metals. Quick question, as they are alcohol based, can you still shade them with washes and glazes in Tmm attempts? Just thinking that the water in said glazes might mess up the effect. If so how do people work shades and highlights with these paints?


    cheers
    me

  2. #2

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    yes, you can shade them normally. you just have to be sure that the metal is dry before you start to shade them. As it is alcohol based it won't take long.

    But what I'd suggest is getting a brush for working with them. It's not the best idea to use a brush with them, that has just been washed out with water.

  3. #3

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    I wouldn't recommend these that much. Being shinier than a lot of the competition the effect they achieve can be very nice, but the incredibly fast drying takes getting used to; it's challenging at best and a bear at worst and can directly interfere with achieving a smooth finish on anything larger than small details if you're applying it by brush.

    If you get some it might be in your best interests to have a dedicated brush/brushes for them as Maxx suggests, but not essential. Once dried - which as you can see won't take long! - you can glaze them with anything you'd normally use, but there is a slight tendency for water-borne paints to bead on the surface.

    Personally I think for a lot of your basic metallic effects on minis one or two of the VMA metallics are a better bet. And in case it's of interest, for anything where you want a "that really looks like metal!" finish Humbrol Metal Cote or Alclad 2. These are enamel and lacquer respectively but worth the hassle of using* if you need that level of result.

    *Airbrushing recommended and necessary respectively.

    Einion

  4. #4

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    Im surprised Einion you say this? I mean I am after a challenge and it is only for small areas yes. I have isopropyl alcohol for mixing them with and white spirit.

    SO when you say beading, is that like literally small beads ont he surface of the model?

    Thanks for the tips also Maxx. Ill be sure to do that.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by ellis_esquire
    Im surprised Einion you say this? I mean I am after a challenge and it is only for small areas yes. I have isopropyl alcohol for mixing them with and white spirit.
    Well I'd always encourage trying things firsthand, individual mileage will always vary.

    You will of course need the alcohol, to rinse your brushes and to thin any paint transferred to the palette as it starts to dry out. You won't need the white spirit.

    Quote Originally Posted by ellis_esquire
    SO when you say beading, is that like literally small beads ont he surface of the model?
    You've seen rain on a waxed car right? A bit like that. It's just something to watch out for as IME it only happens a bit (this will vary, depending on the water and paint used). Easily fixed if it does happen anyway.

    Einion

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Einion View Post
    You've seen rain on a waxed car right? A bit like that. It's just something to watch out for as IME it only happens a bit (this will vary, depending on the water and paint used). Easily fixed if it does happen anyway.
    to be honest I had that effect from VMA acrylics too. Especially for the Chrome and Steel ones. Because the pigments(and mica particles too) are so small, the surface becomes extremely smooth. This smoothness makes it hard to do the glazes properly.
    2 ways around it, that I found:
    - be calm and work on it. After a few layers enough of the glaze adheres to the surface to help the rest go on without beading. (con: takes a few extra passes, time and work)
    - 1 layer of matt varnish via Airbrush/spraycan. Makes the surface just gritty enough for the glazes to adhere. BUT it also takes away some of the shine of the metal (not that big of a problem, if you'll HL them later, but still extra work)

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by MAXXxxx
    to be honest I had that effect from VMA acrylics too. Especially for the Chrome and Steel ones. Because the pigments(and mica particles too) are so small, the surface becomes extremely smooth.
    Mica particles are actually pretty massive by pigment standards! The VMAs though aren't based on mica I think (hence why they look so much better than many similar paints) but on bismuth oxychloride.

    Quote Originally Posted by MAXXxxx
    This smoothness makes it hard to do the glazes properly.
    2 ways around it, that I found:
    - be calm and work on it. After a few layers enough of the glaze adheres to the surface to help the rest go on without beading. (con: takes a few extra passes, time and work)
    - 1 layer of matt varnish via Airbrush/spraycan. Makes the surface just gritty enough for the glazes to adhere. BUT it also takes away some of the shine of the metal (not that big of a problem, if you'll HL them later, but still extra work)
    Agreed. No. 1 in particular will nearly always come right in the end, but you can speed the process up by simply breaking surface tension.

    Einion

  8. #8

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    I found these a complete pain to work with (although this was in hot summer temperatures). About the only thing I found them good for was getting an opaque basecoat down in one layer.
    Like Einion, I much prefer VMA, and the new GW leadbelcher is good (not tried their other new metals).
    I'd be interested to know how you get on with them, please post here when you have.

  9. #9

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