Webmonkey's Garage Kits,... - Page 4
Page 4 of 32 FirstFirst ... 2345614 ... LastLast
Results 61 to 80 of 633

Thread: Webmonkey's Garage Kits,...

  1. #61

    Default

    cats,.. display case,.. clockwork fairy and kakashi,.. in pieces on floor when I got home,...
    It's only a flesh wound!!!


  2. #62

    Default

    Yes, but now you'll have a warm pair of slippers for those cool Cali nights Cats man, what can ya do? It's like sometimes you come home and there's just cat barf there and they give you that non committal look like "oh hey, you're home. So um, that happened. I'm gonna take nap naow."
    "Remember, you can't spell paint without a little pain."

    Blog: almostperftec.blogspot.ca
    Instagram: almost_zab
    DeviantArt Handle: AlmostZab
    Art Amino Handle: Almost Perftec Painting
    P&P: Neil Szabo

  3. #63

    Default

    Captain Harlock,.. complete,..

    It's only a flesh wound!!!


  4. #64

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Webmonkey View Post
    it's coming along a bit slow (not getting much painting time as of late),.. but here's a peek at where I'm at with the cyborg bits,..


    ^^^Are those metallics? I suppose they are. So not NMM but masterful use of some TMM. Same concept as NMM really. You have a mid, a shadow and an almost white HL.

  5. #65

    Default

    That's actually just metallic paint, with a black wash on it. What you are seeing as white highlights, are the actual reflections of the photo lights.
    It's only a flesh wound!!!


  6. #66

    Default

    Right on. TMM is pretty much that. Apply a metallic, wash over it. Reapply metallic. Add a different metallic for the highlight.

    If you ever have questions with blending, I'd be happy to help you, as it really is not too challenging most of the time. You're probably just missing some fundamental step. You'll likely have one of those "ah ha!" moments one day where you just figure it all out. Although your style is compelling that I'd be hesitant to ask you to change anything!

  7. #67

    Default

    Up next,.. Inori Yuzuriha (Guilty Crown). Now today's mystery question,.. do I paint her like the anime? Or do a custom color palette of my own?? Hrmm,.. decision, decision,...

    Anyways,.. here's a shot of the base before I begin.(I think I might try my hand at some gradients on this one.)

    It's only a flesh wound!!!


  8. #68

    Default

    Here's an example of what I mean. I spent about 3 hours yesterday trying to blend a gradient from white to a dark grey. Here's the result.



    I even tried to follow along with a video tutorial,.. and as far as I can tell, I'm doing all the steps exactly as they are shown in the video.

    1) blocking in the basic basecoat colors,.. (let dry)

    2) re-cover the areas in fresh paint,..

    3) drag the brush back and forth from one color to the next to mix the two together

    But while their object comes out with this nice smooth gradient, mine is a streaky-non-blended mess. What am I missing?

    Maybe my ratios of retarder are off? Seemed like the paint was drying too fast. In all the videos, they say they are using retarder, and have their paint thinned. But they never say "how much retarder to how much paint",. or "how thin the paint is". Sometimes they show their mixing tray,.. but that doesn't show the consistency. It's just a blob of colors,.. they could be as thin as ink, or as thick as gel.

    (i'm going to fix this with an airbrush,.. but I'd like some feedback on what I'm doing wrong)
    Last edited by Webmonkey; 07-06-2014 at 06:16 PM.
    It's only a flesh wound!!!


  9. #69

    Default

    Hey Webmonkey. I have similar problems with wet blending so take my advice with a grain of salt for sure.

    From the pic it looks like most of your brush strokes go perpendicular to the direction in which you are trying to establish the gradient (L-R or R-L in the pic). I think you should be going across the line between the two wet areas (Would be up and down in the pic) of colour or even in small circular motions. In JBT's video on it he does these type of movements. He also unloads his brush before starting and just uses a damp brush with no paint.

  10. #70

    Default

    First, I commend you for trying new and challenging things. The only way to grow as a painter. If we always stuck with what we are good at, out painting would eventually get very boring.

    So wet blending. The hardest way to achieve a gradient. The fastest, but also the one requiring the most skill, IMO. I do it on certain areas of a mini, but overall try to avoid it anymore. Streaks to me are a sign of the paint you mixed on the figure was too thin. The consistency of the retarder probably isn't too big of a deal, but of you mix the paint on the figure too watered down, it'll streak. Wet blending isn't meant to go on in the think layers that layering requires. It should probably by watered down no more than a 1:1 ratio. Also don't know how big that base is, but it may be a rather large area to wet blend using just two tones. Meaning you'd probably want to wet blend a white and a mid gray, then a mid gray and a dark gray rather than a white with a dark gray. Wet blending is less forgiving over large surface areas.

    That said, I always reccomend to try layering or juicing to achieve a gradient. It requires less skill I think, and is more consistent. To do this on your base, use watered down paint and start by putting f
    down a middle tone. In this case probably light to mid gray. So if the bottom is white, or lighter, and the top is dark gray, or darker, then you'd push paint in the appropriate direction. For instance, use a tone slightly darker than the mid and push it towards the top of the base. To go darker, select a darker tone than what you just used and push it towards to top of the base but in a smaller area than before. Continue going darker and using a smaller area until you get to your darkest and smallest area. Then do the highlights. Start with a tone just slightly lighter than your mid and push to the bottom of the base. Repeat just like your shadows. Remember to apply enough layers of each tone, and let dry between layers. A much easier process. Try it, I dare you.
    ​You are ranked 1 out of 9149 artists.
    BloodFather's Axis of Chaos http://www.coolminiornot.com/forums/...f-Chaos/page17

  11. #71

    Default

    yeah,.. I did have them going the proper direction to start with, but when it wasn't working, I tried to see if I could smooth the blend by going sideways across the blend lines.
    It's only a flesh wound!!!


  12. #72

    Default

    I had already considered doing more "steps" in the colors. I was actually using a 4 color setup,.. (see pic below)



    And here's a shot of a couple of blending attempts. The on one the right came out ok, though its still "blotchy" and nowhere near as smooth as I'd like it.



    And yeah,.. it's a rather large area. The disk is roughly the size of a baseball.
    It's only a flesh wound!!!


  13. #73

    Default

    Large scale brush blending is not easy by any means. Keep at it you'll get it. Also, sometimes it helps to paint any metallic areas grey first. Helps with coverage and blending
    "Remember, you can't spell paint without a little pain."

    Blog: almostperftec.blogspot.ca
    Instagram: almost_zab
    DeviantArt Handle: AlmostZab
    Art Amino Handle: Almost Perftec Painting
    P&P: Neil Szabo

  14. #74

    Default

    Base is coming along (albeit slowly) with the help of the airbrush. I'll try to get a pic of it up this weekend. In the meantime, here's a look at the torso and legs before I start.



    I actually did the flesh bits. Tried out a new flesh tone, but it seems too orange to me. Might need to switch back to my old skintone.
    It's only a flesh wound!!!


  15. #75

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BloodFather of Kharnath View Post
    Right on. TMM is pretty much that. Apply a metallic, wash over it. Reapply metallic. Add a different metallic for the highlight.
    It can be much much more. With a really similar gradients as NMM, with differences in texture (matt - 'gloss') and a lot of extra effects.


    Quote Originally Posted by Webmonkey View Post
    Here's an example of what I mean. I spent about 3 hours yesterday trying to blend a gradient from white to a dark grey. Here's the result...
    1) blocking in the basic basecoat colors,.. (let dry)
    2) re-cover the areas in fresh paint,..
    3) drag the brush back and forth from one color to the next to mix the two together
    But while their object comes out with this nice smooth gradient, mine is a streaky-non-blended mess. What am I missing?
    - wrong paints. (don't really know how the new GW paints behave, but wet-blending works really bad with VGC for example). In my experience old GW, VMC, VAC works wonderfully, P3 more or less, but also good, VGC really bad as mentioned, no experience with new GW.
    - too thin. for wet-blending you use a relatively thick paint (just see PaintingBuddha's, JenHaley's or JBT's DVDs)
    - no need for retarder (with it you actually lift some of the other color up making it uneven / streaky), water is fine.
    - too small brush (i the base you use belongs to an anime figure, then it's a large surface for most of the brushes we use). Personally on large surfaces I'd rather stick to the airbrush for doing most of the transition.
    - brush has a good point, not spread out a little. having an older, larger, no so pointy brush helps (see Jen Haley's vids for example, where she uses a brush that has no real point to help here)

    The one I sometimes use (for example on my lioness bust last time (see wip-thread)) is the one learned from Jarhead's workshop:
    - the base color is painted on and let it dry
    - on a wetpalette I have about 5 colors (darkest shadow, shadow, base, light, lightest light). Could be more, but the extra contrast I usually do with glazes.
    - paint consistency: base is thinned to about 1:1 or 2:1 (wateraint), others are NOT thinned (just as much as they take up from the palette and later from the brush)

    So I first dip a large, not so good brush in the base color and wet the surface with it (it doesn't have to be dripping, but have to stay wet for a bit), then go to the shadow color and dip the end of the brush in it, taking a really small amount. from the shadow area I go towards the light. As it looses the shadow color and picks up some of the base color it gets thinner and lighter as I go therefore blending the two in one step. Then still without cleaning the brush I either strengthen it or go to the deepest color and do it again. After it's done I wash out the brush and wait for it to dry. Then I can do the lights, same thing, starting from applying the thinned base color.

    Of course it gives only a relatively rough blend(altough even so much better, than I did with hours of work before) that have to be refined with glazes afterwards. And it's fast.


    2 videos I find useful on the subject, from JBT (here, he uses much thinner paints than he uses on his DVD or what I just described):
    http://kws.figurines-tv.com/index.ph...ntaires&id=115 (preshading, but shows a lot more)
    http://kws.figurines-tv.com/index.ph...entaires&id=23 (blending acrylics)


    ohh btw: which videos are you referring to? could you please give names(if DVD) or links (if youtube or similar) ?
    Quote Originally Posted by Webmonkey View Post
    Base is coming along (albeit slowly) with the help of the airbrush. I'll try to get a pic of it up this weekend. In the meantime, here's a look at the torso and legs before I start.
    which figure is this ?

  16. #76

    Default

    Maxx>> I've tried several different ones that I've found on the internet. (can't remember them all) But thanks for the links. Right now, I'm getting pretty good results with the airbrush,.. but the bristle brush method just isn't panning out. I've been getting ok results on the smaller scale stuff I've been fiddling with, but the large scale seems to be a no-go.

    And to answer the other question, it's inori yuzuriha from the anime guilty crown.

    Anyways.. here's where I'm at with the model so far,...

    It's only a flesh wound!!!


  17. #77

    Default

    ok,.. here's a shot of the base. It still needs a few more layers to smooth it out,.. but I think it's coming along nicely (all things considered).

    It's only a flesh wound!!!


  18. #78

    Default

    ok,.. I think this is about as good as I can do,. so I'm gonna go with it,..

    It's only a flesh wound!!!


  19. #79

    Default

    got the body mounted and a few of the frilly bits added. Practicing the gradient on the big base surface really helped prepare me for the smaller section of color on the clothing pieces. Still a ways to go,.. but it is coming along,.. and quite nicely, if I do say so myself. (still a crappy pic though)

    It's only a flesh wound!!!


  20. #80

    Default

    ok,.. got the small squares added to the frilly bits, and managed to get one arm added.



    Unfortunately, the other arm is missing a finger,.. guess I need break out the sculpting clay,..

    Last edited by Webmonkey; 07-21-2014 at 09:49 PM.
    It's only a flesh wound!!!


Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Privacy Policy  |   Terms and Conditions  |   Contact Us  |   The Legion


Copyright © 2001-2018 CMON Inc.

-->