Counting diagonals
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Thread: Counting diagonals

  1. #1

    Default Counting diagonals

    So, when you're counting grids for attack ranges or for movement, you can only use a single diagonal.

    If you had a range of 3 (or more) could you attack a target two grids "east" and two grids "north", going diagonally once and orthoganally twice? For example, if you were on a chessboard, could an MG08 on a1 attack a rifleman on c3?

  2. #2

    Default

    +-+-+-+
    | | |3|
    +-+-+-+
    | | |2|
    +-+-+-+
    |X|1| |
    +-+-+-+

    So, yes.

  3. #3

    Default

    I had to draw this diagram to help someone understand Range(4). Sorry the image is a little strange looking; I didn't have any good tiles, but you'll get the idea.

    The flower is the centre and the green tiles are the limit of the unit's range, everything inside is a target.
    Name:  range.jpg
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  4. #4

    Default

    Laid out like that, it makes perfect sense.

    Thanks for the replies!

  5. #5

    Default

    Great example. For anyone who has done a Final Fantasy Tactics like game then this should jump right out at them.

  6. #6

    Default

    I think this needs an official response from Ted. I don't find the examples in the book particularly helpful at all. I would disagree with both diagrams above. There is a limit of one diagonal move, to reach a target grid by shooting on the X axis and then moving it up on the Y axis to circumvent the diagonal rule is not the intention. I don't think any of the diagrams in the book support such an interpretation.

    My own view is that you effectively have a corridor of targets going up down left and right with the firing model in the centre line and the zone extending one grid either side. So in Donnbobhardy's diagram, the firing model would need to be in grid 1 to hit the other grids. Grid X cannot hit grid 3 as it is two diagonals away and I don't think that 1 space sideways then a diagonal followed by two spaces forwards is a legitimate move. On that basis I do not accept that all the grids inside Decars diagram are valid targets either.

  7. #7

    Default

    Sorry, Capn, but that diagram is exactly right. Green ring and everything inside the green ring is within range 4.

  8. #8

    Default

    Capn if you go back and look at page 17 in the rule book it supports the interpretations that were given here. Think of it as rings, starting with the center you can target all 8 tiles surrounding you. From there you for each additional number in range add the orthogonal locations to what you can already reach. See below:

    Name:  RWRange.JPG
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  9. #9

    Default

    As the others have said, you can only count one diagonal, you can count as many horizontal and vertical grids as you like. The reasoning is not to make grids untargetable, after all there is no logic in doing so, but to reduce the distance to alleviate the problem with measuring with squares instead of a tape measure. Counting diagonals once makes the physical distance similar to vertical, rather than a lot more without doing so.

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Capn Blackheart View Post
    .... Grid X cannot hit grid 3 as it is two diagonals away and I don't think that 1 space sideways then a diagonal followed by two spaces forwards is a legitimate move. On that basis I do not accept that all the grids inside Decars diagram are valid targets either.

    Sorry you are wrong, that is exactly how it works! You can go up, down, left, right as much as you can afford in movement/range distance and no more than one diagonal thrown in.

    This will give you a complete circle radius that you can reach.

  11. #11

    Default

    Yep, sorry, there's no fuzziness concerning this, cap. All those diagrams offered by our fellow gamers are correct.

  12. #12

    Default

    I originally asked the question because I wondered if the "one diagonal" was a tweak to deliberately affect the movement or range of high value units. In other words, it limited ranges to corridors to reduce the raw effectiveness of units like the 65lb-er.

    However, when I saw it laid out in a diagram it became clear(er) to me that the "one diagonal" was just a way of getting circular ranges and not square ones, if you know what I mean.

  13. #13
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    Default

    I think its more to allow units with only one movement point to move a diagonal space, otherwise they will feel like a one lane only unit
    Or with range 1 means they are too easily outflanked

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