Why you have to weight up risks on Crowd-funding things.
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Thread: Why you have to weight up risks on Crowd-funding things.

  1. #1
    Brushlicker crystella333's Avatar
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    Default Why you have to weight up risks on Crowd-funding things.

    This just reminds me of why you should never back something that had been kicked off two other crowd-funding platforms.....

    https://www.change.org/p/proyecto-he..._id=tdqBdekJkx

    They are petitioning the company just to get some info about what the hell is going on

  2. #2

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    I've got to say I've never seen many good things said about kick starters and I have been put off them with the reports I've seen. All the complaints about CMON not delivering to European backers until months after they were supposed to etc and they are one of the good ones!! So this just confirms to me wait until it comes out in the shop and buy what you want; also there's just no way id ever paint all the minis other than one or two of them so what's the point?
    Victis hostibus tuis tibi rapitur videre et audire fletum mulierum. (or as near as google can do it!)
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  3. #3

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    Well, that heroquest project had problems from the very beginning. They started out on kickstarter and then got shut down due to copyright issues. So they moved to a Spanish run site to try again. Seemed like a risky investment to me. And there have been other massive failures on kickstarter, but I don't think they're all bad. I just received my Arena Rex pledge and was very happy with the results. They ran into production delays but that seems very common with these projects. They end up being 10 times bigger than the original goal, add a ton of new figures/features, and it's going to take longer to produce. If it looks to be a big project, expect delays.

    I've also found some very nice small scale projects that had a much easier time delivering on time. Michael Kontraros has released several single figure Indiegogo campaigns. JBT's Figopedia looks like it will be a fantastic project and I expect it will deliver on time or pretty close.

    I know I've invested more in kickstarters than I should have, but if I see a project I really like then I want to support them. That's especially true if they really are a start up and not an already well established company. But I rarely back on concept art alone. I want to see some actual sculpts and have some idea that they can produce the figures/game and will do so at a reasonable level of quality. I think kickstarter and similar sites have done some great things for the miniatures community by helping small companies produce new lines of figures and games that they may not have been able to do any other way. Still, it's good advice to think before you back a project, look for warning signs that there may be trouble ahead, and decide whether or not it's worth the risk. As Andy said, you can often just wait for retail.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bailey03 View Post
    ... They ran into production delays but that seems very common with these projects. They end up being 10 times bigger than the original goal, add a ton of new figures/features, and it's going to take longer to produce. If it looks to be a big project, expect delays.

    I know I've invested more in kickstarters than I should have, but if I see a project I really like then I want to support them. That's especially true if they really are a start up and not an already well established company. But I rarely back on concept art alone. I want to see some actual sculpts and have some idea that they can produce the figures/game and will do so at a reasonable level of quality. I think kickstarter and similar sites have done some great things for the miniatures community by helping small companies produce new lines of figures and games that they may not have been able to do any other way. Still, it's good advice to think before you back a project, look for warning signs that there may be trouble ahead, and decide whether or not it's worth the risk. As Andy said, you can often just wait for retail.
    Seeing the actual Minis is a great criteria to have. I would even wager Rulebook art, if it's a stand-up minis game. I was a Relic Knight pledger (got everything I pledged for very early on...well, once it went to delivery anyway, and I am still not entirely sure all my pieces are account for...only because I do not open a box until I am ready to paint it..guess how many that is) But the concept art for my chosen faction was relatively tasteful (especially for RK)...the figures went too far into Cheesecake and had I known what they would be, I probably would have made a different choice. Some of the other figures (SDE characters come to mind) underwent numerous changes AFTER KS closure and ended up being, ...well, good...in most cases, but went in an entirely other direction.

    I also pledged for 'Sack Puppets,' go look it up for a complete hose job...barely any of us got the puppets and the quality was that of a 6th grade Home Ec. class project. . .

    Anyway, back to minis- Often times, though, the minis have been up to par, of high quality, and great to paint, from great people with good intentions and the wait can be worth it. I am also waiting on a small (admittedly) pledge for Dwarf Gladiators from Mike Leach of Eastern Front Studios. Yes, the figures are WAY beyond expected delivery date, but they are high quality and he has bent over backwards to not only keep backers in the know, but is willing to work with them in any way possible, both in comments/updates and in PMs, so I am happy to wait.
    Impact miniatures were also a welcomed backing. Never really knew I liked Chibi.

    Kickstarter/Indiegogo/etc. really is 'consumers grab bag' on what you'll end up with, but rather than 'expected delivery date,' I really do feel it should be 'overly optimistic date we are trying to believe we can make.'

    Overall, I would go with companies I trust, rather than ideas I like AND NEVER make plans about how/when you recieve the minis from these startup techniques (other industries can also be spotty, but I have minimal experience outside of mini pledges). I've been burned in this way multiple times.
    If you can name your paint colors blindfolded....you might be a brushlicker

  5. #5

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    Kickstarters to me, are like eating at McDonalds. They all look great at first, and it's only later I realize I made a horrible mistake.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by supervike View Post
    Kickstarters to me, are like eating at McDonalds. They all look great at first, and it's only later I realize I made a horrible mistake.
    Some truth to that. I must be close to supporting 50 crowd funded projects. A couple were kind of "meh", a couple i asked myself wth did i pledge, and only one looks like it will not deliver (one person company that has major health issues crop up). So mostly i am satisfied with the support i have given. It is true that i have way more minis than i will ever paint, but heck that was the case before Kickstarter. As long as you perform some basic due diligence and understand risk, i think it is a good platform. If you have any risk aversion you should stay away though.

  7. #7
    Brushlicker crystella333's Avatar
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    And just a kickstarter with something different ending in a day or so
    https://www.kickstarter.com/projects...again?ref=48hr

    Not a bad one to go for something to listen to as you paint

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