Several items
Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Several items

  1. #1
    Newbie, please be gentle DavBan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Taipei, Taiwan
    Posts
    16
    Rep Power
    0

    Default Several items

    I am lucky to get a new camera!
    (Time for me to say bye to the phone-camera :P )
    Although that I still try to understand how to use it, I re-photographed several items that posted before and posted some new stuffs.
    Most of them are Warmachine/Hordes.

    http://www.coolminiornot.com/374464
    CONSTANCE BLAIZE (Warmachine)

    http://www.coolminiornot.com/374466
    ISSYRIA, SIBYL OF DAWN (Warmachine)

    http://www.coolminiornot.com/374467
    KAELYSSA, NIGHT'S WHISPER (Warmachine)

    http://www.coolminiornot.com/374468
    LORD ARCANIST OSSYAN (Warmachine)

    http://www.coolminiornot.com/374469
    MAGE HUNTER ASSASSIN (Warmachine)

    http://www.coolminiornot.com/374471
    RAVYN, ETERNAL LIGHT (Warmachine)

    http://www.coolminiornot.com/374470
    MORVAHNA THE DAWNSHADOW (Hordes)

    http://www.coolminiornot.com/374473
    JEANNE D'ARC (INFINITY)

    http://www.coolminiornot.com/374472
    TOHAA DIPLOMATIC DELEGATES (INFINITY)

    http://www.coolminiornot.com/374465
    TOHAA GAO-TARSOS (INFINITY)

  2. #2
    I paint my thumb. GreenOne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Laurentians, Quebec, Canada
    Posts
    1,814
    Rep Power
    15

    Default

    It's hard to give good feedback when you have a bunch of them presented at the same time, i'll be general.
    Nice stuff, a solid base, interesting colors, they're all 6.5ish in my books, Jeanne is a clean 7, you spent more effort on her I thinks.
    Next steps would be: use thinner paints to achieve smooth transitions and have no visible grain to your paint that can be seen in pictures.
    Amp the contrast a lot for all the NMM and other shiny bits, by that I meant almost black to almost white, all over with starker transitions over strong angles and pure white light spots all over. No way around that if you want a reflective look to them.
    Use colored glazes to make the skintones more alive and less yellow. Good articles are readily available on all those topics.

    Hope this helps, happy painting.
    CMON painter born and raised, soft seven and proud
    Gblaw studio online
    My latest, thanks for watching

  3. #3

    Default

    My first thought (as always) is to address the picture itself first. Let's just use the Constance Blaize model as an example. See how her head, torso, and lower waist/upper thigh areas are in focus,.. and the rest of the shot is all blurry. (ie, her feet, the upper end of the staff, some of the cloth ribbons,.. etc). You are having a "depth of field" problem. In order to help combat this,.. try the following,...

    1) use your macro function

    2) set your ISO as low as possible (usually somewhere around 100 or so)

    3) if your camera has a seperate aperature setting,.. try setting it to somwhere around 16 or so. You may need to go up or down a click or two from there,.. but 16 is a good starting point.

    4) pull your camera back a bit and try to center the figure as best as possible. A good way to think about the picture is to try to realize the the whole "square image" isn't in focus. To help visualize this, get out a piece of standard white paper,.. then go grab a basic cereal bowl out of the cupboard. Turn the bowl upside down on the paper and center it. Now, trace the outside edge of the bowl with a pencil, and then remove the bowl. The circle that's left behind, represents the area of the image that's going to be the most in focus. And once you get outside the circle, the focus gets worse and worse, the further towards the edge of the paper you go. So basically,.. you want to try to get your model "inside the circle" when taking the picture, and then use photoshop or gimp to crop away all the parts of the image that are "outside the circle"

    (hopefully that made sense)

    There are, of course, more things to do that can help. But these few items can vastly improve the quality of the photos.

    Hope this helped a bit.
    It's only a flesh wound!!!


  4. #4
    Newbie, please be gentle DavBan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Taipei, Taiwan
    Posts
    16
    Rep Power
    0

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GreenOne View Post
    It's hard to give good feedback when you have a bunch of them presented at the same time, i'll be general.
    Nice stuff, a solid base, interesting colors, they're all 6.5ish in my books, Jeanne is a clean 7, you spent more effort on her I thinks.
    Next steps would be: use thinner paints to achieve smooth transitions and have no visible grain to your paint that can be seen in pictures.
    Amp the contrast a lot for all the NMM and other shiny bits, by that I meant almost black to almost white, all over with starker transitions over strong angles and pure white light spots all over. No way around that if you want a reflective look to them.
    Use colored glazes to make the skintones more alive and less yellow. Good articles are readily available on all those topics.

    Hope this helps, happy painting.
    Thank you with the advice in amping the contrast.

  5. #5
    Newbie, please be gentle DavBan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Taipei, Taiwan
    Posts
    16
    Rep Power
    0

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Webmonkey View Post
    My first thought (as always) is to address the picture itself first. Let's just use the Constance Blaize model as an example. See how her head, torso, and lower waist/upper thigh areas are in focus,.. and the rest of the shot is all blurry. (ie, her feet, the upper end of the staff, some of the cloth ribbons,.. etc). You are having a "depth of field" problem. In order to help combat this,.. try the following,...
    1) use your macro function
    2) set your ISO as low as possible (usually somewhere around 100 or so)
    3) if your camera has a seperate aperature setting,.. try setting it to somwhere around 16 or so. You may need to go up or down a click or two from there,.. but 16 is a good starting point.
    4) pull your camera back a bit and try to center the figure as best as possible. A good way to think about the picture is to try to realize the the whole "square image" isn't in focus. To help visualize this, get out a piece of standard white paper,.. then go grab a basic cereal bowl out of the cupboard. Turn the bowl upside down on the paper and center it. Now, trace the outside edge of the bowl with a pencil, and then remove the bowl. The circle that's left behind, represents the area of the image that's going to be the most in focus. And once you get outside the circle, the focus gets worse and worse, the further towards the edge of the paper you go. So basically,.. you want to try to get your model "inside the circle" when taking the picture, and then use photoshop or gimp to crop away all the parts of the image that are "outside the circle"
    (hopefully that made sense)
    There are, of course, more things to do that can help. But these few items can vastly improve the quality of the photos.
    Hope this helped a bit.
    Thank you especially on the photograph.
    There are a lot of knowledge I need to know about.

    I did not know what's the macro function of camera. I will read the manual again.

  6. #6

    Default

    The macro function basically tells the camera that you are trying to photograph something small. The camera then adjusts its focal range accordingly.
    It's only a flesh wound!!!


Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Privacy Policy  |   Terms and Conditions  |   Contact Us  |   The Legion


Copyright © 2001-2018 CMON Inc.

-->