How do i paint scratches on either a flat top or curved surfaces.
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Thread: How do i paint scratches on either a flat top or curved surfaces.

  1. #1

    Default How do i paint scratches on either a flat top or curved surfaces.

    Question while i know how to paint vertical scratches on the side a black side on top and white on the bottom.
    But what about scratches that is on top of a vehicle like the top of tank or scratch that curves over to top of a hat or a shoe or something like that.
    How to i make that look realistic?
    Do i use the same technique or how exactly do i do it?
    It´s the theory behind it i have a little difficult comprehending, when a scratch is on the side it´s basically the light shinning down on the scratch and higeligting the bottom of it.
    But with a flat surface the light would more or less shine directly down on the entire scratch.
    Should then put a highlight all around the edge and in the middle or what exactly?
    Same with the curved surface by it´s very nature there would be some areas where the light wouldn´t reach should i just leave them black with some base color in the middle or how?

  2. #2
    Senior Member Ghool's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Erikjust View Post
    Question while i know how to paint vertical scratches on the side a black side on top and white on the bottom.
    But what about scratches that is on top of a vehicle like the top of tank or scratch that curves over to top of a hat or a shoe or something like that.
    How to i make that look realistic?
    Do i use the same technique or how exactly do i do it?
    It´s the theory behind it i have a little difficult comprehending, when a scratch is on the side it´s basically the light shinning down on the scratch and higeligting the bottom of it.
    But with a flat surface the light would more or less shine directly down on the entire scratch.
    Should then put a highlight all around the edge and in the middle or what exactly?
    Same with the curved surface by it´s very nature there would be some areas where the light wouldn´t reach should i just leave them black with some base color in the middle or how?
    Basically the same method applies to all surfaces. As you state, on a curved surface, only highlight the scratch as far as you think the light would reach.
    As for a flat surface like a tank top, just have the highlight come from the same direction as your light source. This is why light sourcing from the slight left or right works best, as you can fudge details like that on a flat surface where the highlight direction isn't really apparent.

    You can also use artistic license as well, and fudge it to look how you want. There aren't any hard and fast rules unless you're dead-set on making it look 100% real.

  3. #3

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    Are you using reference to help you ? Look up damaged surfaces, it doesn't have to be what you're painting, so it doesn't have to be a tank or a hat or a shoe but look up anything that has difference sides showing and use it as a reference file. With mini's everything is exaggerated but really it's how you want to do it, test it on a spare or old mini and see what looks best. Then apply it to the one you're working on.
    In the kingdom of the blind, the one eyed man is king.

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    Senior Member Ghool's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by eyeayen View Post
    Are you using reference to help you ? Look up damaged surfaces, it doesn't have to be what you're painting, so it doesn't have to be a tank or a hat or a shoe but look up anything that has difference sides showing and use it as a reference file. With mini's everything is exaggerated but really it's how you want to do it, test it on a spare or old mini and see what looks best. Then apply it to the one you're working on.
    I just work right on the mini itself, with no reference. But, I usually don't worry about being 100% accurate with my lighting either. I use a very stylized light sourcing technique that looks good, not forced, or too strange. That's my main point, really - just go at it, and see if it looks good. If not, repaint.

    I always work on the model itself, and if it sucks, I just do a repaint. I find it wastes less time, and I don't need to find a practice model.

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