question for exp. gw painters...
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Thread: question for exp. gw painters...

  1. #1

    Default question for exp. gw painters...

    my question is in regards to the glossiness of gw paints...

    no matter what technique i use to thin my paints the mini always seems to have a slight glossy appearance to it.

    i\'ve noticed that some of the most experienced gw painters (i.e. bobby wong, matt verzani) use gw paints, but achieve a matte look...how is this accomplished?

    is it something simple like just using a matte sealer? Is there some other way that im overlooking? Or is it just the way it is?

    Thanx....

    beej :cool:

  2. #2

    Default

    Nearly every good painter I know uses a Matte sealer of some kind. I just bought a can of Testor\'s Dull Cote - and from all accounts it\'s superior. Havent tried it yet though.

    Actually a good recipe from pros who sell miniatures is to apply first one coat of Gloss followed by two seperate coats of Matte after. That\'s to give you a good and handleable mini. For display you could probably get away with just one of Matte or Dull (the terms are interchangeable).


  3. #3
    aku_djinn
    Guest

    Default Matte Finish

    Testor\'s is the best matte finish I have been using a long time, but it is not enough to protect a mini from wear and tear, you need to give it a coat of GW sealant or Armory, what have you, first--then a coat of testor\'s. It will affect the quality of the finish b/c the sealants don\'t go on thinly. But it defines a gaming piece vs. a display piece. Just so you know before you go blasting your best minis with a thick coat of sealant...

    I\'ve had the same problem with the gloss effect after using Future floor wax as a thinner to the GW paints in those horrible new jars... haven\'t resolved it myself either satisfactorily.

  4. #4
    DD
    Guest

    Default matte paint

    Hi. This is my first message on this site. I have no experience in fantasy figures but in historical models.
    How to obtain figures that are not glossy, if you use oil paint it is said that you must make a mix of different colours and do not use a basic one alone (red, blue, yellow...) (e.g. for a red coat you will have to mix red, yellow and brown). Moreover, what you can do is placing your figure under a lamp to dry it.
    Hope that will help.

  5. #5

    Default

    I\'ve found that certain colors tend to have a glossier finish than others, especially reds, oranges, and browns. I tend to water these colors down more than normal when applying them, and the glossy effect will disappear after the paint has completely cured.
    Since I generally don\'t seal my own models, I can\'t comment on the dullcoat, but I\'ve heard its pretty decent.

  6. #6
    Consummate Brushlicker Jericho's Avatar
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    Default

    I\'ve always liked a good semi-gloss varnish myself, but there hasn\'t been a very good one that I\'ve found. The Purity Seal GW sells is pretty close I think. As long as you don\'t hose the model in it, the shine isn\'t that strong, but it adds a bit of richness to the colors whereas matte varnishes can make them a lot flatter. Plus, the shine does fade considerably as time goes on... after a couple years it looks just like the mini before being varnished (I know because Purity Seal is the same as the old school matte varnish GW sold like 5-6 years ago).

    The little bit of gloss allows for light to play on the surface a bit more to make more shades and hilights, but does it with enough subtlety to prevent the freshly waxed convertible look :D

    So yeah, personally I like a little bit of shine and Purity Seal used carefully is fine for that.

  7. #7

    Default

    Hey, there\'s nothing wrong with that \"Waxed car look\" if that\'s the effect you\'re going for.
    My model car collection would look pretty silly in matte finish, or even semi-gloss for the paint. And, running with that thought a little, a Tiger tank would look pretty silly in semi-gloss... so flat is the answer there. I think that finish is should be reserved for a model-by-model judgement, but that\'s just me.

    Joe

  8. #8

    Default

    ya - badaab - obviously! ;) On a single miniature, I go back typically, and though a figure has been matted, gloss the areas that need to be shiny - jewels again, weapon hilts, buttons, metal things in general, etc etc.

    Hey! congrats on membership!

  9. #9

    Default Flat finish on Tanks

    Originally posted by Badaab
    .. a Tiger tank would look pretty silly in semi-gloss... so flat is the answer there.
    Joe
    Actually, while tanks and such are initially painted in a flat finish, after a little use in the field they take on a semi-gloss finish. Therefore, a matte finish is more appropriate; a completely flat finish on a model tank looks lifeless and unrealistic. I have actual field experience with WWII german armor, and while it wasn\'t a Tiger, it did include 251D halftracks, a Hetzer, and a StugIII.

    If you want, check out the Imperial Guard vehicles I painted in a tri-color camo scheme, one of which one Bronze at the Chicago Golden Demons this year. They all have a matte finish.
    http://members.aol.com/drdresch/gal40kig.htm

    Regards,
    David D.
    Online Miniature Painting and Modeling Guide
    http://members.aol.com/drdresch

  10. #10

    Default

    Well, thanks, Flashman... I noticed the 100 posts drawing near so I sort of pushed it, to get \"Membership\"... lol

    Point taken, dresch, but I think you and I might have different interpretations of matte and semi-gloss... I don\'t interchange the terms, although I know a lot of people do. Its just my background in photography speaking, and semi-gloss paper has a different finish when compared to matte, or flat, or pearl, or gloss, or... well you get the idea.

    Also, nice tanks... congrats on the Demon.

    Joe

  11. #11

    Default matte look

    I had the glossy look problem before, but that was before I started to use incredibly thinned paint. I dont use ANY inks on my figures either and it makes it alot tougher to make the figure look like it has a good contrast (I love contrast). But I feel its worth it when my figure has that \'all paint , no ink\' consistency.

    Basicaly, try thin your paints down . More water = less pigment which = a matte look. Ever seen a drop of water dry completely ? It will give you an idea as to what water does when you add it to paint.

  12. #12
    Sturmhalo
    Guest

    Default

    No need to worry about the finish that different paints have (glossy, semi, matte)! One coat of matte varnish and everything has a uniform finish! If you want semi or gloss areas just pick them out with a suitable type of varnish.

    Easy peasy

    :D

  13. #13
    Seth Gecko
    Guest

    Default

    I have had the same problem of glossiness from GW paints for many years. I have found a solution from Tamiya, they make a pot in their paint range called \'Flat base\'. I mix a little bit of this with the colour I\'m using, and it always comes out flat or matt.

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