Creating cast shadows with OSL!
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Thread: Creating cast shadows with OSL!

  1. #1

    Default Creating cast shadows with OSL!

    This Clay Cyanide figure was a great way to show how to create a cast shadow while doing Object Source lighting.

    You can check out the painting session here: https://youtu.be/9L7IdMi-fig

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  2. #2
    Senior Member CyAniDe's Avatar
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    Wow great job. Really love your OSL paintings. Thanks a lot for putting all these great tutorials with your tips to youtube.

    I still have struggles with oils. Espeacially with reds. My Cadmium Reds are quite orange (Van Gogh Cadmium Red Light/ Schmincke Nroma Cadmium Red Light). The Old Holland Cadmium Red Light is more reddish but it doesn't stick well, kinda slides around and leaves a lot of brush marks. It kinda behaves like a transparent paint in that regard although it's opaque. Should I maybe try a dark/medium cadmium red? Was about to try the Abteilung Red but I had my doubts since the price was so low compared to artist grade paints and since you mentioned them in your video I can save that money now ^^

  3. #3

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    I use the Fanchion Red from Williamsburg, but reds can be notoriously "slippery". It is just the nature of that particular color. One that that I do in the Army Painting series is allow the red to dry, and then go back into it later. Even allowing the paint several minutes to "set" can make a big difference. Also, I am not "layering" like acrylics, so the paint is not piling up, which can help with brush strokes, etc.

  4. #4
    Senior Member CyAniDe's Avatar
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    Thanks for the tip, I will give it some other trys and quite reassuring that I didn't just get a "bad" tube xD

    I already managed to get some better results with Scheveningen Red. I usually use oils on larger surfaces for wet in wet blendings or feathering since it's super realxing with oils. I really like the fact you can push and pull them around for hours. It happend during the blending of the edges of the Cadmium Red though that I "ripped" of the paint rather then stretching and blending it. But I will give it some time in the future to properly set Maybe I also still have gotten some terpentine left in the brush when I applied it.

    So thanks for the comment and keep up your great work! Really a joy to watch you paint with oils and you make it look so easy.

  5. #5

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    Another important aspect is to use that high quality odorless thinner, as that is far gentler on the paints.. and the brushes too!

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